Sir Francis Bacon

(1561 - 1626 / England)

Sir Francis Bacon Quotes

  • ''There is as much difference between the counsel that a friend giveth, and that a man giveth himself, as there is between the counsel of a friend and of a flatterer. For there is no such flatterer as is a man's self.''
    Francis Bacon (1561-1626), British philosopher, essayist, statesman. "Of Friendship," Essays (1597-1625).
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  • ''It is a strange desire, to seek power, and to lose liberty; or to seek power over others, and to lose power over a man's self.''
    Francis Bacon (1561-1626), British philosopher, essayist, statesman. "Of Great Place," Essays (1597-1625).
  • ''He that will not apply new remedies, must expect new evils: for Time is the greatest innovator: and if Time, of course, alter things to the worse, and wisdom and counsel shall not alter them to the better, what shall be the end?''
    Francis Bacon (1561-1626), British philosopher, essayist, statesman. "Of Innovations," Essays (1597-1625).
  • ''Certainly the best works, and of greatest merit for the public, have proceeded from the unmarried, or childless men.''
    Francis Bacon (1561-1626), British philosopher, essayist, statesman. "Of Marriage and Single Life," Essays (1597).
  • ''He that hath wife and children hath given hostages to fortune; for they are impediments to great enterprises, either of virtue or mischief.''
    Francis Bacon (1561-1626), British philosopher, essayist, statesman. "Of Marriage and Single Life," Essays (1597-1625).
  • ''Children sweeten labours, but they make misfortunes more bitter.''
    Francis Bacon (1561-1626), British lawyer, philosopher and essayist. (1625). "Of Parents and Children," Essays.
  • ''The joys of parents are secret, and so are their griefs and fears.''
    Francis Bacon (1561-1626), British lawyer, philosopher and essayist. "Of Parents and Children," Essays (1625).
  • ''Certainly fame is like a river, that beareth up things light and swoln, and drowns things weighty and solid.''
    Francis Bacon (1561-1626), British philosopher, statesman. "Of Praise," The Essayes or Counsels (1625).
  • ''Revenge is a kind of wild justice, which the more a man's nature runs to, the more ought law to weed it out.''
    Francis Bacon (1561-1626), British philosopher, essayist, statesman. "Of Revenge," Essays (1597-1625). "A man that studieth revenge," Bacon added later in the essay, "keeps his own wounds green."
  • ''Nakedness is uncomely, as well in mind as body, and it addeth no small reverence to men's manners and actions if they be not altogether open.... Therefore set it down: That a habit of secrecy is both politic and moral.''
    Francis Bacon (1561-1626), British philosopher, essayist, statesman. "Of Simulation and Dissimulation," Essays (1597-1625).

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Best Poem of Sir Francis Bacon

The Life Of Man

The world's a bubble; and the life of man less than a span.
In his conception wretched; from the womb so to the tomb:
Curst from the cradle, and brought up to years, with cares and fears.
Who then to frail mortality shall trust,
But limns the water, or but writes in dust.
Yet, since with sorrow here we live oppress'd, what life is best?
Courts are but only superficial schools to dandle fools:
The rural parts are turn'd into a den of savage men:
And where's a city from all vice so free,
But may be term'd the worst of all the three?

Domestic cares afflict the ...

Read the full of The Life Of Man

Guiltless Heart

The man of life upright, whose guiltless heart is free
From all dishonest deeds and thoughts of vanity:
The man whose silent days in harmless joys are spent,
Whom hopes cannot delude, nor fortune discontent;
That man needs neither towers nor armor for defense,
Nor secret vaults to fly from thunder's violence:
He only can behold with unaffrighted eyes
The horrors of the deep and terrors of the skies;
Thus scorning all the care that fate or fortune brings,

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