Sir Francis Bacon

(1561 - 1626 / England)

Sir Francis Bacon Quotes

  • ''There is nothing makes a man suspect much, more than to know little.''
    Francis Bacon (1561-1626), British philosopher, essayist, statesman. "Of Suspicion," Essays (1597-1625).
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  • ''Whosoever is delighted in solitude is either a wild beast or a god.''
    Francis Bacon (1561-1626), British philosopher, essayist, statesman. Quoting an anonymous source, in "Of Friendship," Essays (1597-1625).
  • ''For also knowledge itself is power.''
    Francis Bacon (1561-1626), British philosopher, essayist, statesman. Religious Meditations, "Of Heresies," (1597).
  • ''We are much beholden to Machiavel and others, that write what men do, and not what they ought to do.''
    Francis Bacon (1561-1626), British philosopher, essayist, statesman. The Advancement of Learning, bk. 2, ch. 21, sct. 9 (1605).
  • ''If a man will begin with certainties, he shall end in doubts, but if he will be content to begin with doubts, he shall end in certainties.''
    Francis Bacon (1561-1626), British philosopher, essayist, statesman. The Advancement of Learning, bk. 1, ch. 5, sct. 8 (1605).
  • ''They are ill discoverers that think there is no land when they see nothing but sea.''
    Francis Bacon (1561-1626), British philosopher, essayist, statesman. The Advancement of Learning, bk. 2, ch. 7, sct. 5 (1605).
  • ''Human knowledge and human power meet in one; for where the cause is not known the effect cannot be produced. Nature to be commanded must be obeyed; and that which in contemplation is as the cause is in operation as the rule.''
    Francis Bacon (1560-1626), British leading political figure, essayist. The Great Instauration, Aphorism 3, p. 272, Essays, Advancement of Learning, New Atlantis, and Other Pieces, ed. Richard Foster Jones, Odyssey Press, New York (1937). An important statement of the "new science."
  • ''For man is but the servant and interpreter of nature: what he does and what he knows is only what he has observed of nature's order in fact or in thought; beyond this he knows nothing and can do nothing.''
    Francis Bacon (1560-1626), British political figure, essayist. The Great Instauration, "Plan of the Work," p. 264, Essays, Advancement of Learning, New Atlantis, and Other Pieces, ed. Richard Foster Jones, Odyssey Press, New York (1937). An important statement of the "new science."
  • ''Man, being the servant and interpreter of nature, can do and understand so much and so much only as he has observed in fact or in the course of nature: beyond this he neither knows anything nor can do anything.''
    Francis Bacon (1560-1626), British leading political figure, essayist. The Great Instauration, Aphorism 1, p. 272, Essays, Advancement of Learning, New Atlantis, and Other Pieces, ed. Richard Foster Jones, Odyssey Press, New York (1937). An important statement of the "new science."
  • ''For my name and memory I leave to men's charitable speeches, and to foreign nations and the next ages.''
    Francis Bacon (1561-1626), British philosopher, essayist, statesman. Last will, December 19, 1625. Works, vol. 3 (1765).

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Best Poem of Sir Francis Bacon

The Life Of Man

The world's a bubble; and the life of man less than a span.
In his conception wretched; from the womb so to the tomb:
Curst from the cradle, and brought up to years, with cares and fears.
Who then to frail mortality shall trust,
But limns the water, or but writes in dust.
Yet, since with sorrow here we live oppress'd, what life is best?
Courts are but only superficial schools to dandle fools:
The rural parts are turn'd into a den of savage men:
And where's a city from all vice so free,
But may be term'd the worst of all the three?

Domestic cares afflict the ...

Read the full of The Life Of Man

Guiltless Heart

The man of life upright, whose guiltless heart is free
From all dishonest deeds and thoughts of vanity:
The man whose silent days in harmless joys are spent,
Whom hopes cannot delude, nor fortune discontent;
That man needs neither towers nor armor for defense,
Nor secret vaults to fly from thunder's violence:
He only can behold with unaffrighted eyes
The horrors of the deep and terrors of the skies;
Thus scorning all the care that fate or fortune brings,

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