Sir Francis Bacon

(1561 - 1626 / England)

Sir Francis Bacon Quotes

  • ''For my name and memory I leave it to men's charitable speeches, and to foreign nations, and the next ages.''
    Francis Bacon (1561-1626), British philosopher, essayist, statesman. last will, Dec. 19, 1625. Works of Francis Bacon, vol. 3 (ed. 1765). Appointed Lord Chancellor in 1618, Bacon was removed from office three years later for accepting a bribe from a litigant. Alexander Pope summed up his character thus: "If parts allure thee, think how Bacon shined, The wisest, brightest, meanest of mankind." (Essay on Man, epistle 4, l. 281-2).
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  • ''If we do not maintain Justice, Justice will not maintain us.''
    Francis Bacon (1561-1626), British philosopher, essayist, statesman. speech for prosecution, as Attorney General, in Overbury murder case (Nov. 1615).
  • ''It is the true office of history to represent the events themselves, together with the counsels, and to leave the observations and conclusions thereupon to the liberty and faculty of every man's judgement.''
    Francis Bacon (1561-1626), British philosopher, essayist, statesman. Advancement of Learning, bk. 2 (1605).
  • ''It is as hard and severe a thing to be a true politician as to be truly moral.''
    Francis Bacon (1561-1626), British philosopher, essayist, statesman. Advancement of Learning, bk. 2 (1605).
  • ''I do not believe that any man fears to be dead, but only the stroke of death.''
    Francis Bacon (1561-1626), British philosopher, essayist, statesman. An Essay on Death.
  • ''Age appears to be best in four things—old wood best to burn, old wine to drink, old friends to trust, and old authors to read.''
    Francis Bacon (1561-1626), British philosopher, essayist, statesman. Apophthegms, no. 97 (1625). Quoting Alonso of Aragon.
  • ''There was a young man in Rome that was very like Augustus Caesar; Augustus took knowledge of it and sent for the man, and asked him "Was your mother never at Rome?" He answered "No Sir; but my father was."''
    Francis Bacon (1561-1626), British philosopher, essayist, statesman. Apothegms, no. 87 (1624).
  • ''As the births of living creatures, at first, are ill-shapen: so are all Innovations, which are the births of time.''
    Francis Bacon (1561-1626), British philosopher, essayist, statesman. Essays, "Of Innovations," (1597-1625). In his Annotations to Bacon (c. 1798), William Blake commented: "What a cursed fool is this, Ill Shapen! Are infants or small plants ill shapen because they are not yet come to their maturity? What a contemptible fool is this Bacon!" (In Complete Writings, ed. Keynes, 1957).
  • ''Histories make men wise; poets witty; the mathematics subtle; natural philosophy deep; moral grave; logic and rhetoric able to contend.''
    Francis Bacon (1561-1626), British philosopher, essayist, statesman. Essays, "Of Studies," (1597-1625).
  • ''Men of age object too much, consult too long, adventure too little, repent too soon, and seldom drive business home to the full period, but content themselves with a mediocrity of success.''
    Francis Bacon (1561-1626), British philosopher, essayist, statesman. Essays, "Of Youth and Age," (1597-1625).

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Best Poem of Sir Francis Bacon

The Life Of Man

The world's a bubble; and the life of man less than a span.
In his conception wretched; from the womb so to the tomb:
Curst from the cradle, and brought up to years, with cares and fears.
Who then to frail mortality shall trust,
But limns the water, or but writes in dust.
Yet, since with sorrow here we live oppress'd, what life is best?
Courts are but only superficial schools to dandle fools:
The rural parts are turn'd into a den of savage men:
And where's a city from all vice so free,
But may be term'd the worst of all the three?

Domestic cares afflict the ...

Read the full of The Life Of Man

Help Lord

Help Lord, for godly men have took their flight,
And left the earth to be the wicked's den:
Not one that standeth fast to Truth and Right,
But fears, or seeks to please, the eyes of men.
When one with other fall's to take apart,
Their meaning goeth not with their words in proof;
But fair they flatter, with a cloven heart,
By pleasing words, to work their own behoof.

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