Sir Francis Bacon

(1561 - 1626 / England)

Sir Francis Bacon Quotes

  • ''Read not to contradict and confute; nor to believe and take for granted; nor to find talk and discourse; but to weigh and consider.''
    Francis Bacon (1561-1626), British philosopher, essayist, statesman. Essays, "Of Studies," (1597-1625).
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  • ''A little philosophy inclineth man's mind to atheism, but depth in philosophy bringeth men's minds about to religion.''
    Francis Bacon (1561-1626), British philosopher, essayist, statesman. Essays, "Of Atheism," (1597-1625).
  • ''What is truth? said jesting Pilate; and would not stay for an answer.''
    Francis Bacon (1561-1626), British philosopher, essayist, statesman. Essays, "Of Truth," (1597-1625). opening words of essay, alluding to Bible, St. John 18:38.
  • ''Reading maketh a full man; conference a ready man; and writing an exact man.''
    Francis Bacon (1561-1626), British philosopher, essayist, statesman. Essays, "Of Studies," (1597-1625).
  • ''Money is like muck, not good except it be spread.''
    Francis Bacon (1561-1626), British philosopher, statesman, essayist. Essays, "Of Seditions and Troubles," (1597-1625).
  • ''Cure the disease and kill the patient.''
    Francis Bacon (1561-1626), British philosopher, essayist, statesman. Essays, "Of Friendship," (1597-1625).
  • ''Houses are built to live in, and not to look on: therefore let use be preferred before uniformity.''
    Francis Bacon (1561-1626), British philosopher, essayist, statesman. Essays, "Of Building," (1597-1625). Bacon adds, "except where both may be had."

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Best Poem of Sir Francis Bacon

Guiltless Heart

The man of life upright, whose guiltless heart is free
From all dishonest deeds and thoughts of vanity:
The man whose silent days in harmless joys are spent,
Whom hopes cannot delude, nor fortune discontent;
That man needs neither towers nor armor for defense,
Nor secret vaults to fly from thunder's violence:
He only can behold with unaffrighted eyes
The horrors of the deep and terrors of the skies;
Thus scorning all the care that fate or fortune brings,
He makes the heaven his book, his wisdom heavenly things;
Good thoughts his only friends, his wealth a ...

Read the full of Guiltless Heart

The Life Of Man

The world's a bubble; and the life of man less than a span.
In his conception wretched; from the womb so to the tomb:
Curst from the cradle, and brought up to years, with cares and fears.
Who then to frail mortality shall trust,
But limns the water, or but writes in dust.
Yet, since with sorrow here we live oppress'd, what life is best?
Courts are but only superficial schools to dandle fools:
The rural parts are turn'd into a den of savage men:
And where's a city from all vice so free,

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