Susan Brownell Anthony

(1820-1906 / Adams, Massachusetts)

Susan Brownell Anthony Quotes

  • ''What are they applauding for?''
    Susan B. Anthony (1820-1906), U.S. suffragist. As quoted in History of Woman Suffrage, vol. 5 ch. 2, by Ida Husted Harper (1922). From a Washington Times report of the thirty-fourth annual convention of the National Woman Suffrage Association, held in Washington, D.C., in February 1902. Anthony, who had been a suffrage leader for fifty years and would celebrate her eighty- second birthday during the convention, looked around the room and said this when greeted by "a thunder of applause" from the delegates.
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  • ''Mr. Douglass talks about the wrongs of the negro; but with all the outrages that he to-day suffers, he would not exchange his sex and take the place of Elizabeth Cady Stanton.''
    Susan B. Anthony (1820-1906), U.S. suffragist. As quoted in History of Woman Suffrage, vol. 2, ch. 22, by Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Matilda Joslyn Gage, and herself (1882). Speaking at a May 12, 1869, anniversary celebration of the Equal Rights Association, held in New York. Anthony was disagreeing with Frederick Douglass (c. 1817-1895), the distinguished African American advocate of African American rights and universal suffrage. Douglass had argued that African American men's need for suffrage was more urgent than women's. Stanton (1815-1902) was a prominent suffragist and was Anthony's closest colleague and friend.
  • ''White men have always controlled their wives' wages. Colored men were not able to do so until they themselves became free. Then they owned both their wives and their wages.''
    Susan B. Anthony (1820-1906), U.S. suffragist. As quoted in History of Woman Suffrage, vol. 4, ch. 15, by Susan B. Anthony and Ida Husted Harper (1902). Addressing the twenty-seventh annual convention of the National Woman Suffrage Association, held January 31-February 5, 1895, in Atlanta, Georgia. Anthony was referring to the fact that employed married women had no right of control over their own wages.
  • ''Not one of our national officers ever has had a dollar of salary. I retire on full pay!''
    Susan B. Anthony (1820-1906), U.S. suffragist. As quoted in History of Woman Suffrage, vol. 4, ch. 21, by Susan B. Anthony and Ida Husted Harper (1902). On resigning the presidency of the National Woman Suffrage Association in February 1900. Then in her eightieth year of life, Anthony had held office in woman suffrage organizations continuously for forty-eight years.
  • ''Now, Mr. President, we don't intend to trouble you during the campaign but after you are elected, then look out for us!''
    Susan B. Anthony (1820-1906), U.S. suffragist. As quoted in History of Woman Suffrage, vol. 5, ch. 4, by Ida Husted Harper (1922). Attending the thirty-sixth annual convention (February 1904) of the National Woman Suffrage Association, Anthony was introduced to President Theodore Roosevelt (1858-1919), who was not a woman suffrage advocate. Having succeeded to the Presidency after the assassination of President William McKinley, Roosevelt was now running for election to his second term (first full term). Anthony quoted herself as having said this to him.
  • ''Oh, yes, I'd do it all again; the spirit is willing yet; I feel the same desire to do the work but the flesh is weak. It's too bad that our bodies wear out while our interests are just as strong as ever.''
    Susan B. Anthony (1820-1906), U.S. suffragist. As quoted in Life and Work of Susan B. Anthony, vol. 3 ch. 71, by Anna Howard Shaw, to Ida Husted Harper (1908). In March 1906, on her death bed, in answer to the question of her sister suffragist, Rev. Anna Howard Shaw (1847-1919): "... as you look back on the past, if you had to live it over again, would you do the same?"
  • ''In 1872 I received a request like this and I did register and vote, for which I was arrested, convicted and fined $100. Excuse me if I decline to repeat the experience.''
    Susan B. Anthony (1820-1906), U.S. suffragist. As quoted in Life and Work of Susan B. Anthony, vol. 3, ch. 62, by Ida Husted Harper (1908). Written to a political committee in 1902 upon receipt of a post card reminding her to register to vote; it had been sent to S. B. Anthony under the erroneous assumption that, as head of household, "S. B." must be a man. Her message was widely reprinted by newspapers, one headlining its front-page story: "Susan B. Anthony Scores One." (Anthony had refused to pay the $100 fine imposed upon her thirty years earlier, because she did not recognize her action as properly illegal.).
  • ''... even if the right to vote brought to women no better work, no better pay, no better conditions in any way, she should have it for her own self-respect and to compel man's respect for her.''
    Susan B. Anthony (1820-1906), U.S. suffragist. As quoted in Life and Work of Susan B. Anthony, vol. 3, ch. 62, by Ida Husted Harper (1908). In a letter dated June 27, 1903, to Margaret A. Haley, President of the National Federation of Teachers. Anthony believed, and counselled Haley to argue, that women could force improvement in their salaries and working conditions if they had to the power of the ballot; she emphasized, nonetheless, that the vote was inherently essential.
  • ''Oh, if I could but live another century and see the fruition of all the work for women! There is so much yet to be done.''
    Susan B. Anthony (1820-1906), U.S. suffragist. As quoted in Life and Work of Susan B. Anthony, vol. 3, ch. 60, by Ida Husted Harper (1908). In a 1902 interview. At age 82, Anthony was still active but in poor health. She had worked ceaselessly for woman suffrage for 50 years; once ridiculed and reviled, she had lived to be an internationally honored figure. However, American women would not gain the vote until 1920, fourteen years after her death.
  • ''They let the girls in.''
    Susan B. Anthony (1820-1906), U.S. suffragist. As quoted in Life and Work of Susan B. Anthony, vol. 3, ch. 58, by Ida Husted Harper (1908). With this line written in her diary on September 10, 1900, Anthony noted the success of a long and costly campaign to get women admitted to the University of Rochester on the same basis as men. Despite her advanced age, she had played a major role in the effort. She apparently made the diary entry immediately after returning home from a meeting with the University of Rochester's Board of Trustees.

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