Tacitus


Tacitus Quotes

  • ''Noble character is best appreciated in those ages in which it can most readily develop.''
    Tacitus.
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  • ''Who the first inhabitants of Britain were, whether natives or immigrants, remains obscure; one must remember we are dealing with barbarians.''
    Tacitus (c. 55-120), Roman historian. Agricola, sect. 11.
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  • ''To plunder, butcher, steal, these things they misname empire: they make a desolation and they call it peace.''
    Tacitus (c. 55-c. 120), Roman historian. Agricola, sct. 30. Ascribed by Tacitus to a Scottish chief, Calgacus, on the Roman victory at Mons Graupius, near Inverness.
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  • ''It is human nature to hate the man whom you have hurt.''
    Tacitus (c. 55-c. 120), Roman historian. Agricola, sct. 42.
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  • ''The arbiter of taste.''
    Tacitus (c. 55-c. 120), Roman historian. Annals, bk. 15, ch. 18. Referring to the satirist Petronius, often given the name Arbiter.
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  • ''To plunder, to slaughter, to steal, these things they misname empire; and where they make a wilderness, they call it peace.''
    Tacitus (c. 55-c. 120), Roman historian. Quoting the British chief Calgalus speaking of the Romans, in Agricola, sect. 30.
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  • ''They make a wilderness and call it peace.
    (Solitudinem faciunt pacem appellant.)''
    Tacitus (c. 55-120), Roman historian. Tacitus, in Agricola, sect. 30. Quoting the British chief Calgalus, speaking of the Romans.
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  • ''A shocking crime was committed on the unscrupulous initiative of few individuals, with the blessing of more, and amid the passive acquiescence of all.''
    Tacitus (c. 55-120), Roman historian. The Histories, bk. 1, sect. 28. On the assassination of Emperor Galba.
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  • ''The principle office of history I take to be this: to prevent virtuous actions from being forgotten, and that evil words and deeds should fear an infamous reputation with posterity.''
    Tacitus (c. 55-117), Roman historian. The Histories, bk. 3, sect. 65.
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  • ''The principal office of history I take to be this: to prevent virtuous actions from being forgotten, and that evil words and deeds should fear an infamous reputation with posterity.''
    Tacitus (c. 55-c. 120), Roman historian. The Histories, bk. 3, sct. 65.
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