Thomas Hardy

(2 June 1840 – 11 January 1928 / Dorchester / England)

Thomas Hardy Quotes

  • ''And yet to every bad there is a worse.''
    Thomas Hardy (1840-1928), British novelist, poet. The Woodlanders, ch. 34 (1887).
    152 person liked.
    50 person did not like.
  • ''And ghosts then keep their distance; and I know some liberty.''
    Thomas Hardy (1840-1928), British novelist, poet. Wessex Heights (l. 32). . . The Complete Poems of Thomas Hardy. James Gibson, ed. (1978) Macmillan.
    78 person liked.
    55 person did not like.
  • ''It is difficult for a woman to define her feelings in language which is chiefly made by men to express theirs.''
    Thomas Hardy (1840-1928), British novelist, poet. Bathsheba, in Far from the Madding Crowd, ch. 51 (1874).
    126 person liked.
    56 person did not like.
  • ''The value of old age depends upon the person who reaches it. To some men of early performance it is useless. To others, who are late to develop, it just enables them to finish the job.''
    Thomas Hardy (1840-1928), British novelist, poet. "Birthday Notes," quoted in Florence Emily Hardy, The Later Years of Thomas Hardy, ch. 17 (1930).
    92 person liked.
    50 person did not like.
  • ''Of course poets have morals and manners of their own, and custom is no argument with them.''
    Thomas Hardy (1840-1928), British novelist, poet. Faith, in The Hand of Ethelberta, ch. 2 (1875).
    61 person liked.
    59 person did not like.
  • ''It is safer to accept any chance that offers itself, and extemporize a procedure to fit it, than to get a good plan matured, and wait for a chance of using it.''
    Thomas Hardy (1840-1928), British novelist, poet. Far from the Madding Crowd, ch. VI (1874).
    14 person liked.
    8 person did not like.
  • ''A resolution to avoid an evil is seldom framed till the evil is so far advanced as to make avoidance impossible.''
    Thomas Hardy (1840-1928), British novelist, poet. Far from the Madding Crowd, ch. 18 (1874).
    14 person liked.
    8 person did not like.
  • ''A lover without indiscretion is no lover at all. Circumspection and devotion are a contradiction in terms.''
    Thomas Hardy (1840-1928), British novelist, poet. Ladywell, in The Hand of Ethelberta, ch. 20 (1875).
    14 person liked.
    7 person did not like.
  • ''Some folk want their luck buttered.''
    Thomas Hardy (1840-1928), British novelist, poet. Mrs. Cuxcom, in The Mayor of Casterbridge, ch. 13 (1886).
    12 person liked.
    8 person did not like.
  • ''Like the British Constitution, she owes her success in practice to her inconsistencies in principle.''
    Thomas Hardy (1840-1928), British novelist, poet. Mrs. Napper, in The Hand of Ethelberta, ch. 9 (1876). Speaking of Ethelberta.
    12 person liked.
    8 person did not like.

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Best Poem of Thomas Hardy

"How Great My Grief" (Triolet)

How great my grief, my joys how few,
Since first it was my fate to know thee!
- Have the slow years not brought to view
How great my grief, my joys how few,
Nor memory shaped old times anew,
   Nor loving-kindness helped to show thee
How great my grief, my joys how few,
   Since first it was my fate to know thee?

Read the full of "How Great My Grief" (Triolet)

The Dream-Follower

A dream of mine flew over the mead
   To the halls where my old Love reigns;
And it drew me on to follow its lead:
   And I stood at her window-panes;

And I saw but a thing of flesh and bone
   Speeding on to its cleft in the clay;
And my dream was scared, and expired on a moan,
   And I whitely hastened away.

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