Thomas Mann

(1875-1955 / Lübeck)

Thomas Mann Quotes

  • ''Disease was a perverse, a dissolute form of life.''
    Thomas Mann (1875-1955), German author, critic. Originally published as Der Zauberberg, Fischer (1924). The Magic Mountain, ch. 5, p. 285, trans. by Helen T. Lowe-Porter, The Modern Library, McGraw-Hill (1955). Hans Castorp's conclusion of his extensive research into the matter and meaning of life.
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  • ''What was life?''
    Thomas Mann (1875-1955), German author, critic. Originally published as Der Zauberberg, Fischer (1924). The Magic Mountain, ch. 5, p. 274-275, trans. by Helen T. Lowe-Porter, The Modern Library, McGraw-Hill (1955). Hans Castorp's repeated question in his search for the primal matter and meaning of life.
  • ''And lending it one mental fillip the more, the fact that all these people were inwardly attacked by well-nigh resistless decay, and that most of them were feverish.''
    Thomas Mann (1875-1955), German author, critic. Originally published as Der Zauberberg, Fischer (1924). The Magic Mountain, ch. 4, p. 112, trans. by Helen T. Lowe-Porter, The Modern Library, McGraw-Hill (1955).
  • ''The more they talk the more lecherous they get.''
    Thomas Mann (1875-1955), German author, critic. Originally published as Der Zauberberg, Fischer (1924). The Magic Mountain, ch. 6, p. 417, trans. by Helen T. Lowe-Porter, The Modern Library, McGraw-Hill (1955). Hofrat Behrens' spoof of the Freudian talking cure.
  • ''I never can understand how anyone can not smoke—it deprives a man of the best part of life ... with a good cigar in his mouth a man is perfectly safe, nothing can touch him—literally.''
    Thomas Mann (1875-1955), German author, critic. Originally published as Der Zauberberg, Fischer (1924). The Magic Mountain, ch. 3, p. 48, trans. by Helen T. Lowe-Porter, The Modern Library, McGraw-Hill (1955). Hans Castorp's symptomatic oral fixation with smoking.
  • ''I, for one, have never in my life come across a perfectly healthy human being.''
    Thomas Mann (1875-1955), German author, critic. Originally published as Der Zauberberg, Fischer (1924). The Magic Mountain, ch. 1, p. 16, trans. by Helen T. Lowe-Porter, The Modern Library, McGraw-Hill (1955). Krokowski, the psychoanalyst of the Magic Mountain, expresses its universal credo.
  • ''Disease makes men more physical, it leaves them nothing but body.''
    Thomas Mann (1875-1955), German author, critic. Originally published as Der Zauberberg, Fischer (1924). The Magic Mountain, ch. 4, p. 178, trans. by Helen T. Lowe-Porter, The Modern Library, McGraw-Hill (1955).
  • ''Our air up here is good for the disease—I mean good against the disease,... but it is also good for the disease.''
    Thomas Mann (1875-1955), German author, critic. Originally published as Der Zauberberg, Fischer (1924). The Magic Mountain, ch. 4, p. 181, trans. by Helen T. Lowe-Porter, The Modern Library, McGraw-Hill (1955). Hofrat Behrens' equivocal praise of his sanatorium.
  • ''L'amour pour lui, pour le corps humain, c'est de même un intérêt extrêmement humanitaire et une puissance plus éducative que toute la pédagogie du monde!''
    Thomas Mann (1875-1955), German author, critic. Originally published as Der Zauberberg, Fischer (1924). The Magic Mountain, ch. 5, p. 342, trans. by Helen T. Lowe-Porter, The Modern Library, McGraw-Hill (1955). Hans Castorp's summa of his variegated education in the first part of The Magic Mountain.
  • ''Russian women all have something free and large about them.''
    Thomas Mann (1875-1955), German author, critic. Originally published as Der Zauberberg, Fischer (1924). The Magic Mountain, ch. 4, p. 137, trans. by Helen T. Lowe-Porter, The Modern Library, McGraw-Hill (1955).

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