Thomas Paine

(1737-1809 / the USA)

Thomas Paine Quotes

  • ''Suspicion is the companion of mean souls, and the bane of all good society.''
    Thomas Paine (1737-1809), Anglo-American political theorist, writer. Common Sense (1776).
    22 person liked.
    8 person did not like.
  • ''In the progress of politics, as in the common occurrences of life, we are not only apt to forget the ground we have travelled over, but frequently neglect to gather up experiences as we go.''
    Thomas Paine (1737-1809), Anglo-American political theorist, writer. Common Sense (1777). Written as part of a series of pamphlets and entitled The American Crisis III and signed Common Sense.
    14 person liked.
    14 person did not like.
  • ''Society in every state is a blessing, but Government, even in its best state, is but a necessary evil; in its worst state, an intolerable one.''
    Thomas Paine (1737-1809), Anglo-U.S. political theorist, writer. Common Sense, ch. 1 (1776).
    16 person liked.
    5 person did not like.
  • ''When we are planning for posterity, we ought to remember that virtue is not hereditary.''
    Thomas Paine (1737-1809), Anglo-American political theorist, writer. Common Sense, ch. 4 (1776).
    12 person liked.
    7 person did not like.
  • ''Those who expect to reap the blessings of freedom, must, like men, undergo the fatigues of supporting it.''
    Thomas Paine (1737-1809), Anglo-American political theorist, writer. Common Sense (1777). Written as part of a series of pamphlets and entitled The American Crisis IV and signed Common Sense.
    17 person liked.
    5 person did not like.
  • ''Everything that is right or natural pleads for separation. The blood of the slain, the weeping voice of nature cries, 'tis time to part.''
    Thomas Paine (1737-1809), Anglo-American political theorist, writer. Common Sense (1776).
    4 person liked.
    1 person did not like.
  • ''He that rebels against reason is a real rebel, but he that in defence of reason rebels against tyranny has a better title to "Defender of the Faith," than George the Third.''
    Thomas Paine (1737-1809), Anglo-American political theorist, writer. Common Sense (1776). Written as part of a series of pamphlets and entitled The American Crisis II and signed Common Sense.
    4 person liked.
    0 person did not like.
  • ''To establish any mode to abolish war, however advantageous it might be to Nations, would be to take from such Government the most lucrative of its branches.''
    Thomas Paine (1737-1809), Anglo-American political theorist, writer. "Conclusion," pt. 1, The Rights of Man (1791).
    3 person liked.
    1 person did not like.
  • ''The summer soldier and the sunshine patriot will, in this crisis, shrink from the service of his country; but he that stands it NOW deserves the love and thanks of man and woman.''
    Thomas Paine (1737-1809), Anglo-American political theorist, writer. First published in Pennsylvania Journal (December 19, 1776). Introduction to the first of a series of pamphlets entitled "The American Crisis," (December 23, 1776). George Washington ordered this paper to be read to his troops, December 26, 1776, on the eve of the Battle of Trenton, New Jersey.
    5 person liked.
    0 person did not like.
  • ''The final event to himself has been, that as he rose like a rocket, he fell like the stick.''
    Thomas Paine (1737-1809), Anglo-U.S. political theorist, writer. Letter to the Addressers on the Late Proclamation (1792). Referring to Paine's political adversary Edmund Burke.
    3 person liked.
    1 person did not like.

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Best Poem of Thomas Paine

Lines Extempore

Quick as the lightning's vivid flash
The poet's eye o'er Europe rolls;
Sees battles rage, hears tempests crash,
And dims at horror's threatening scowls -

Marks ambition's ruthless king,
With crimson'd banners scathe the globe,
While trailing after conquest's wing,
Man's festering wounds his demons probe.

Palled with streams of reeking gore -
That stain the proud imperial day;
He turns to view the Western shore,
Where freedom holds her boundless sway.

'Tis here her sage triumphant sways
An empire in the people's love,
'Tis here...

Read the full of Lines Extempore

Liberty Tree

In a chariot of light from the regions of day,
The Goddess of Liberty came;
Ten thousand celestials directed the way
And hither conducted the dame.
A fair budding branch from the gardens above,
Where millions with millions agree,
She brought in her hand as a pledge of her love,
And the plant she named Liberty Tree.
The celestial exotic struck deep in the ground,

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