Walt Whitman

(31 May 1819 - 26 March 1892 / New York / United States)

Walt Whitman Quotes

  • ''Rugged, mountainous, volcanic, he was himself more a French revolution than any of his volumes.''
    Walt Whitman (1819-1892), U.S. poet. Specimen Days (Feb. 10, 1881).
    489 person liked.
    255 person did not like.
  • ''I will put in my poems, that with you is heroism, upon land and sea—And
    I will report all heroism from an American point of view.''
    Walt Whitman (1819-1892), U.S. poet. Starting From Paumanok, sct. 7.
    430 person liked.
    225 person did not like.
  • ''And I will show that nothing can happen more beautiful than death.''
    Walt Whitman (1819-1892), U.S. poet. Starting From Paumanok, sct. 13.
    475 person liked.
    245 person did not like.
  • ''I never see that man without feeling that he is one to become personally attach'd to, for his combination of purest, heartiest tenderness, and native western form of manliness.''
    Walt Whitman (1819-1892), U.S. poet. "The Inauguration," March 4, 1865, Specimen Days and Collect (1882).
    339 person liked.
    221 person did not like.
  • ''The proof of a poet is that his country absorbs him as affectionately as he has absorbed it.''
    Walt Whitman (1819-1892), U.S. poet. Leaves of Grass, preface (1855).
    346 person liked.
    207 person did not like.
  • ''The art of art, the glory of expression and the sunshine of the light of letters, is simplicity.''
    Walt Whitman (1819-1892), U.S. poet. Leaves of Grass, preface (1855).
    64 person liked.
    13 person did not like.
  • ''There is that indescribable freshness and unconsciousness about an illiterate person that humbles and mocks the power of the noblest expressive genius.''
    Walt Whitman (1819-1892), U.S. poet. Leaves of Grass, preface (1855).
    40 person liked.
    15 person did not like.
  • ''The United States themselves are essentially the greatest poem.''
    Walt Whitman (1819-1892), U.S. poet. Leaves of Grass, preface (1855).
    45 person liked.
    15 person did not like.
  • ''As soon as histories are properly told there is no more need of romances.''
    Walt Whitman (1819-1892), U.S. poet. Leaves of Grass, preface (1855).
    37 person liked.
    14 person did not like.
  • ''To have great poets, there must be great audiences too.''
    Walt Whitman (1819-1892), U.S. poet. "Ventures on an Old Theme," Notes Left Over (1881). This motto adorned the front of Poetry magazine and was the object of the vitriolic disapproval of Ezra Pound, who, in 1914, wrote in the pages of the magazine: "The artist is not dependent on the multitude of his listeners.... This rabble, this multitude—does not create the great artist. They are aimless and drifting without him." See also Ezra Pound's remark under "the arts."
    44 person liked.
    13 person did not like.

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Best Poem of Walt Whitman

A Child Said, What Is The Grass?

A child said, What is the grass? fetching it to me with full
hands;
How could I answer the child?. . . .I do not know what it
is any more than he.

I guess it must be the flag of my disposition, out of hopeful
green stuff woven.

Or I guess it is the handkerchief of the Lord,
A scented gift and remembrancer designedly dropped,
Bearing the owner's name someway in the corners, that we
may see and remark, and say Whose?

Or I guess the grass is itself a child. . . .the produced babe
of the vegetation.

Or I guess it is a uniform ...

Read the full of A Child Said, What Is The Grass?

Camps Of Green


NOT alone those camps of white, O soldiers,
When, as order'd forward, after a long march,
Footsore and weary, soon as the light lessen'd, we halted for the
night;
Some of us so fatigued, carrying the gun and knapsack, dropping
asleep in our tracks;
Others pitching the little tents, and the fires lit up began to
sparkle;

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