Willard Van Orman Quine


Willard Van Orman Quine Quotes

  • ''Language is a social art.''
    Willard Van Orman Quine (b. 1908), U.S. professor of philosophy (Harvard University). Word and Object, p. ix, MIT Press (1960).
    0 person liked.
    0 person did not like.
  • ''Entification begins at arm's length; the points of condensation in the primordial conceptual scheme are things glimpsed, not glimpses.''
    Willard Van Orman Quine (b. 1908), U.S. philosopher. Word and Object, p. 1, MIT Press (1960).
  • ''[T]here is no breaking out of the intentional vocabulary by explaining its members in other terms.''
    Willard Van Orman Quine (b. 1908), U.S. professor of philosophy (Harvard University). Word and Object, p. 220, MIT Press (1960).
  • ''We do not learn first what to talk about and then what to say about it.''
    Willard Van Orman Quine (b. 1908), U.S. philosopher, logician. Word and Object, p. 16 (1960). On the inseparability of ontology and empirical belief.
  • ''It is one of the consolations of philosophy that the benefit of showing how to dispense with a concept does not hinge on dispensing with it.''
    Willard Van Orman Quine (b. 1908), U.S. philosopher, logician. Word and Object, p. 190 (1960). On the view that by reducing a concept to what is already clear, we license its use.
  • '''Ouch' is not independent of social training. One has only to prick a foreigner to appreciate that it is an English word.''
    Willard Van Orman Quine (b. 1908), U.S. philosopher, logician. Word and Object, section 2, MIT Press (1960).
  • ''Treating 'water' as a name of a single scattered object is not intended to enable us to dispense with general terms and plurality of reference. Scatter is in fact an inconsequential detail.''
    Willard Van Orman Quine (b. 1908), U.S. philosopher. Word and Object, p. 99, MIT Press (1960).
  • ''Some may find comfort in reflecting that the distinction between an eliminative and an explicative physicalism is unreal.''
    Willard Van Orman Quine (b. 1908), U.S. professor of philosophy (Harvard University). Word and Object, p. 265, MIT Press (1960).
  • ''Theory may be deliberate, as in a chapter on chemistry, or it may be second nature, as in the immemorial doctrine of ordinary enduring middle-sized physical objects.''
    Willard Van Orman Quine (b. 1908), U.S. philosopher, logician. Word and Object, section 3, MIT Press (1960).

Read more quotations »
[Report Error]