William Blake

(28 November 1757 – 12 August 1827 / London)

William Blake Quotes

  • ''Truly, My Satan, thou art but a Dunce,
    And dost not know the Garment from the Man.
    Every Harlot was a Virgin once,
    Nor can'st thou ever change Kate into Nan.''
    William Blake (1757-1827), British poet, painter, mystic. For the Sexes: The Gates of Paradise (Epilogue, l. 1-4). . . The Complete Poems [William Blake]. Alicia Ostriker, ed. (1977) Penguin Books.
    1002 person liked.
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  • ''I see every thing I paint in this world, but everybody does not see alike. To the eyes of a miser a guinea is more beautiful than the sun, and a bag worn with the use of money has more beautiful proportions than a vine filled with grapes.''
    William Blake (1757-1827), British poet, painter, engraver. letter, Aug. 23, 1799. The Letters of William Blake (1956).
    815 person liked.
    488 person did not like.
  • ''For where'er the sun does shine,
    And where'er the rain does fall,
    Babe can never hunger there,
    Nor poverty the mind appall.''
    William Blake (1757-1827), British poet, painter, mystic. Holy Thursday (l. 13-16). . . The Complete Poems [William Blake]. Alicia Ostriker, ed. (1977) Penguin Books.
    659 person liked.
    475 person did not like.
  • ''Want of money and the distress of a thief can never be alleged as the cause of his thieving, for many honest people endure greater hardships with fortitude. We must therefore seek the cause elsewhere than in want of money, for that is the miser's passion, not the thief's.''
    William Blake (1757-1827), British poet, painter, engraver. letter, Aug. 23, 1799. The Letters of William Blake (1956).
    577 person liked.
    422 person did not like.
  • ''Is this a holy thing to see
    In a rich and fruitful land,
    Babes reduced to misery,
    Fed with cold and usurous hand?''
    William Blake (1757-1827), British poet, painter, mystic. Holy Thursday (l. 1-4). . . The Complete Poems [William Blake]. Alicia Ostriker, ed. (1977) Penguin Books.
    213 person liked.
    118 person did not like.
  • ''My mother bore me in the southern wild,
    And I am black, but O! my soul is white;''
    William Blake (1757-1827), British poet, painter, mystic. From SONGS OF INNOCENCE. The Little Black Boy (l. 1-2). . . The Complete Poems [William Blake]. Alicia Ostriker, ed. (1977) Penguin Books.
    87 person liked.
    28 person did not like.
  • ''Beneath them sit the aged men, wise guardians of the poor;
    Then cherish pity, lest you drive an angel from your door.''
    William Blake (1757-1827), British poet, painter, mystic. From SONGS OF INNOCENCE. Holy Thursday (l. 11-12). . . The Complete Poems [William Blake]. Alicia Ostriker, ed. (1977) Penguin Books.
    64 person liked.
    28 person did not like.
  • ''When I from black and he from white cloud free,
    And round the tent of Godlike lambs we joy,

    I'll shade him from the heat till he can bear
    To lean in joy upon our father's knee;
    And then I'll stand and stroke his silver hair,
    And be like him, and he will then love me.''
    William Blake (1757-1827), British poet, painter, mystic. From SONGS OF INNOCENCE. The Little Black Boy (l. 23-28). . . The Complete Poems [William Blake]. Alicia Ostriker, ed. (1977) Penguin Books.
    63 person liked.
    30 person did not like.
  • ''The hum of multitudes was there, but multitudes of lambs,
    Thousands of little boys and girls raising their innocent hands.''
    William Blake (1757-1827), British poet, painter, mystic. Holy Thursday (l. 1-4). . . The Complete Poems [William Blake]. Alicia Ostriker, ed. (1977) Penguin Books.
    50 person liked.
    27 person did not like.
  • ''"And we are put on earth a little space,
    That we may learn to bear the beams of love,''
    William Blake (1757-1827), British poet, painter, mystic. From SONGS OF INNOCENCE. The Little Black Boy (l. 13-14). . . The Complete Poems [William Blake]. Alicia Ostriker, ed. (1977) Penguin Books.
    141 person liked.
    29 person did not like.

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Best Poem of William Blake

Auguries Of Innocence

To see a World in a Grain of Sand
And a Heaven in a Wild Flower,
Hold Infinity in the palm of your hand
And Eternity in an hour.

A Robin Red breast in a Cage
Puts all Heaven in a Rage.
A dove house fill'd with doves & Pigeons
Shudders Hell thro' all its regions.
A dog starv'd at his Master's Gate
Predicts the ruin of the State.
A Horse misus'd upon the Road
Calls to Heaven for Human blood.
Each outcry of the hunted Hare
A fibre from the Brain does tear.
A Skylark wounded in the wing,
A Cherubim does cease to sing.
The Game Cock clipp'd and ...

Read the full of Auguries Of Innocence

Why Was Cupid A Boy

Why was Cupid a boy,
And why a boy was he?
He should have been a girl,
For aught that I can see.

For he shoots with his bow,
And the girl shoots with her eye,
And they both are merry and glad,
And laugh when we do cry.

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