William Blake

(28 November 1757 – 12 August 1827 / London)

William Blake Quotes

  • ''I wander thro' each charter'd street,
    Near where the charter'd Thames does flow,
    And mark in every face I meet
    Marks of weakness, marks of woe.''
    William Blake (1757-1827), British poet, painter, engraver. Songs of Experience, "London," (1794), repr. In Complete Writings, ed. Geoffrey Keynes (1957).
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  • ''The enquiry in England is not whether a man has talents & genius, but whether he is passive & polite & a virtuous ass & obedient to noblemen's opinions in art & science. If he is, he is a good man. If not, he must be starved.''
    William Blake (1757-1827), British poet, painter, engraver. repr. In Complete Writings, ed. Geoffrey Keynes (1957). Annotations to Sir Joshua Reynolds, Discourses (c. 1808).
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  • ''I was angry with my friend:
    I told my wrath, my wrath did end.
    I was angry with my foe:
    I told it not, my wrath did grow.''
    William Blake (1757-1827), British poet, painter, engraver. Songs of Experience, "A Poison Tree," st. 1 (1794), repr. In Complete Writings, ed. Geoffrey Keynes (1957).
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  • ''The foundation of empire is art & science. Remove them or degrade them, & the empire is no more. Empire follows art & not vice versa as Englishmen suppose.''
    William Blake (1757-1827), British poet, painter, engraver. repr. In Complete Writings, ed. Geoffrey Keynes (1957). Annotations to Sir Joshua Reynolds, Discourses (c. 1808).
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  • '''O Earth, O Earth, return!
    'Arise from out the dewy grass;
    'Night is worn,
    'And the morn
    'Rises from the slumberous mass.''
    William Blake (1757-1827), British poet, painter, mystic. Songs of Experience: Introduction (l. 11-15). . . The Complete Poems [William Blake]. Alicia Ostriker, ed. (1977) Penguin Books.
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  • ''In the morning glad I see
    My foe outstretch'd beneath the tree.''
    William Blake (1757-1827), British poet, painter, mystic. A Poison Tree (l. 15-16). . . The Complete Poems [William Blake]. Alicia Ostriker, ed. (1977) Penguin Books.
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  • ''Hear the voice of the Bard!
    Who Present, Past and Future, sees;''
    William Blake (1757-1827), British poet, painter, mystic. Songs of Experience: Introduction (l. 1-2). . . The Complete Poems [William Blake]. Alicia Ostriker, ed. (1977) Penguin Books.
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  • ''The Beggar's Rags, fluttering in Air,
    Does to Rags the Heavens tear.''
    William Blake (1757-1827), British poet, painter, mystic. Auguries of Innocence (l. 75-76). . . The Complete Poems [William Blake]. Alicia Ostriker, ed. (1977) Penguin Books.
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  • ''On a cloud I saw a child,
    And he laughing said to me,

    "Pipe a song about a Lamb";
    So I piped with merry chear.
    "Piper pipe that song again"—
    So I piped, he wept to hear.

    "Drop thy pipe thy happy pipe
    Sing thy songs of happy chear";
    So I sung the same again
    While he wept with joy to hear.''
    William Blake (1757-1827), British poet, painter, mystic. Songs of Innocence: Introduction (l. 3-11). . . The Complete Poems [William Blake]. Alicia Ostriker, ed. (1977) Penguin Books.
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  • ''A Robin Redbreast in a cage
    Puts all Heaven in a Rage.''
    William Blake (1757-1827), British poet, painter, engraver. Auguries of Innocence, l. 5-6, Poems from the Pickering Manuscript (c. 1803), repr. In Complete Writings, ed. Geoffrey Keynes (1957).
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Best Poem of William Blake

Auguries Of Innocence

To see a World in a Grain of Sand
And a Heaven in a Wild Flower,
Hold Infinity in the palm of your hand
And Eternity in an hour.

A Robin Red breast in a Cage
Puts all Heaven in a Rage.
A dove house fill'd with doves & Pigeons
Shudders Hell thro' all its regions.
A dog starv'd at his Master's Gate
Predicts the ruin of the State.
A Horse misus'd upon the Road
Calls to Heaven for Human blood.
Each outcry of the hunted Hare
A fibre from the Brain does tear.
A Skylark wounded in the wing,
A Cherubim does cease to sing.
The Game Cock clipp'd and ...

Read the full of Auguries Of Innocence

Samson

Samson, the strongest of the children of men, I sing; how he was foiled by woman's arts, by a false wife brought to the gates of death! O Truth! that shinest with propitious beams, turning our earthly night to heavenly day, from presence of the Almighty Father, thou visitest our darkling world with blessed feet, bringing good news of Sin and Death