William Blake

(28 November 1757 – 12 August 1827 / London)

William Blake Quotes

  • ''The Maiden caught me in the Wild,
    Where I was dancing merrily;
    She put me into her Cabinet
    And Lock'd me up with a golden Key.''
    William Blake (1757-1827), British poet, painter, mystic. The Crystal Cabinet (l. 1-4). . . The Complete Poems [William Blake]. Alicia Ostriker, ed. (1977) Penguin Books.
    1 person liked.
    0 person did not like.
  • ''It is not because angels are holier than men or devils that makes them angels, but because they do not expect holiness from one another, but from God only.''
    William Blake (1757-1827), British poet, painter, engraver. repr. In Complete Writings, ed. Geoffrey Keynes (1957). "A Vision of the Last Judgement," (1810).
    8 person liked.
    3 person did not like.
  • ''And all must love the human form,
    In heathen, Turk, or Jew.
    Where Mercy, Love, and Pity dwell
    There God is dwelling too.''
    William Blake (1757-1827), British poet, painter, mystic. From SONGS OF INNOCENCE. The Divine Image (l. 17-20). . . The Complete Poems [William Blake]. Alicia Ostriker, ed. (1977) Penguin Books.
    3 person liked.
    1 person did not like.
  • ''Thinking as I do that the Creator of this world is a very cruel being, & being a worshipper of Christ, I cannot help saying: "the Son, O how unlike the Father!" First God Almighty comes with a thump on the head. Then Jesus Christ comes with a balm to heal it.''
    William Blake (1757-1827), British poet, painter, engraver. A Vision of the Last Judgement (1810), repr. In Complete Writings, ed. Geoffrey Keynes (1957).
    2 person liked.
    0 person did not like.
  • ''For Mercy has a human heart,
    Pity, a human face;
    And Love, the human form divine,
    And Peace, the human dress.''
    William Blake (1757-1827), British poet, painter, mystic. From SONGS OF INNOCENCE. The Divine Image (l. 9-12). . . The Complete Poems [William Blake]. Alicia Ostriker, ed. (1977) Penguin Books.
    0 person liked.
    0 person did not like.
  • ''You cannot have Liberty in this world without what you call Moral Virtue, & you cannot have Moral Virtue without the slavery of that half of the human race who hate what you call Moral Virtue.''
    William Blake (1757-1827), British poet, painter, engraver. repr. In Complete Writings, ed. Geoffrey Keynes (1957). A Vision of the Last Judgment (c. 1810).
    2 person liked.
    0 person did not like.
  • ''"Such, such were the joys
    When we all, girls and boys,
    In our youth time were seen
    On the Echoing Green."''
    William Blake (1757-1827), British poet, painter, mystic. From SONGS OF INNOCENCE. The Echoing Green (l. 17-20). . . The Complete Poems [William Blake]. Alicia Ostriker, ed. (1977) Penguin Books.
    0 person liked.
    0 person did not like.
  • ''Prepare your hearts for Death's cold hand! prepare
    Your souls for flight, your bodies for the earth;
    Prepare your arms for glorious victory;
    Prepare your eyes to meet a holy God!
    Prepare, prepare!''
    William Blake (1757-1827), British poet, painter, mystic. A War Song to Englishmen (l. 6-10). . . The Complete Poems [William Blake]. Alicia Ostriker, ed. (1977) Penguin Books.
    1 person liked.
    0 person did not like.
  • ''If thought is life
    And strength & breath,
    And the want
    Of thought is death;

    Then am I
    A happy fly,
    If I live,
    Or if I die.''
    William Blake (1757-1827), British poet, painter, mystic. The Fly (l. 13-20). . . The Complete Poems [William Blake]. Alicia Ostriker, ed. (1977) Penguin Books.
    1 person liked.
    0 person did not like.
  • ''What is grand is necessarily obscure to weak men. That which can be made explicit to the idiot is not worth my care.''
    William Blake (1757-1827), British poet, painter, engraver. letter, Aug. 23, 1799. Complete Writings, ed. Geoffrey Keynes (1957).
    9 person liked.
    4 person did not like.

Read more quotations »
Best Poem of William Blake

A Divine Image

Cruelty has a human heart,
And Jealousy a human face;
Terror the human form divine,
And Secresy the human dress.

The human dress is forged iron,
The human form a fiery forge,
The human face a furnace sealed,
The human heart its hungry gorge.

Read the full of A Divine Image

Why Was Cupid A Boy

Why was Cupid a boy,
And why a boy was he?
He should have been a girl,
For aught that I can see.

For he shoots with his bow,
And the girl shoots with her eye,
And they both are merry and glad,
And laugh when we do cry.

[Report Error]