William Blake

(28 November 1757 – 12 August 1827 / London)

William Blake Quotes

  • ''How sweet I roam'd from field to field
    And tasted all the summer's pride,
    Till I the Prince of Love beheld
    Who in the sunny beams did glide!''
    William Blake (1757-1827), British poet, painter, mystic. How sweet I roam'd from field to field (l. 1-4). . . The Complete Poems [William Blake]. Alicia Ostriker, ed. (1977) Penguin Books.
    14 person liked.
    5 person did not like.
  • ''Man has no Body distinct from his Soul; for that call'd Body is a portion of Soul discern'd by the five Senses, the chief inlets of Soul in this age.''
    William Blake (1757-1827), British poet, painter, engraver. The Marriage of Heaven and Hell, plate 4, "The Voice of the Devil," (1790-1793).
    22 person liked.
    7 person did not like.
  • ''With sweet May dews my wings were wet,
    And Phoebus fir'd my vocal rage;
    He caught me in his silken net,
    And shut me in his golden cage.

    He loves to sit and hear me sing,
    Then, laughing, sports and plays with me;
    Then stretches out my golden wing,
    And mocks my loss of liberty.''
    William Blake (1757-1827), British poet, painter, mystic. How sweet I roam'd from field to field (l. 9-16). . . The Complete Poems [William Blake]. Alicia Ostriker, ed. (1977) Penguin Books.
    16 person liked.
    4 person did not like.
  • ''The tygers of wrath are wiser than the horses of ainstruction.''
    William Blake (1757-1827), British poet, painter, engraver. The Marriage of Heaven and Hell, plate 9, "Proverbs of Hell," (c. 1793), repr. In Complete Writings, ed. Geoffrey Keynes (1957).
    238 person liked.
    124 person did not like.
  • ''I askèd a thief to steal me a peach
    He turned up his eyes
    I ask'd a lithe lady to lie her down
    Holy & meek she cries—

    As soon as I went
    An angel came.
    He wink'd at the thief
    And smild at the dame—

    And without one word said
    Had a peach from the tree
    And still as a maid
    Enjoy'd the lady.''
    William Blake (1757-1827), British poet, painter, mystic. I Askèd a Thief (l. 1-12). . . The Complete Poems [William Blake]. Alicia Ostriker, ed. (1977) Penguin Books.
    16 person liked.
    4 person did not like.
  • ''The road of excess leads to the palace of wisdom.''
    William Blake (1757-1827), British poet, painter, engraver. The Marriage of Heaven and Hell, plate 7, "Proverbs of Hell," (c. 1793), repr. In Complete Writings, ed. Geoffrey Keynes (1957).
    230 person liked.
    113 person did not like.
  • ''The record of one's life must needs prove more interesting to him who writes it than to him who reads what has been written.
    "I have no name:
    "I am but two days old."
    What shall I call thee?
    "I happy am,
    "Joy is my name."
    Sweet joy befall thee!''
    William Blake (1757-1827), British poet, painter, engraver, and Martha Ostenso. repr. In Complete Writings, ed. Geoffrey Keynes (1957). "Infant Joy," st. 1, Songs of Innocence (1789).
    14 person liked.
    1 person did not like.
  • ''The man who never alters his opinion is like standing water, and breeds reptiles of the mind.''
    William Blake (1757-1827), British poet, painter, engraver. The Marriage of Heaven and Hell, plates 17-20, "A Memorable Fancy," (c. 1793), repr. In Complete Writings, ed. Geoffrey Keynes (1957).
    240 person liked.
    105 person did not like.
  • ''I have no name.
    I am but two days old.
    What shall I call thee?
    I happy am,
    Joy is my name.
    Sweet joy befall thee!''
    William Blake (1757-1827), British poet, painter, mystic. From SONGS OF INNOCENCE. Infant Joy (l. 1-6). . . The Complete Poems [William Blake]. Alicia Ostriker, ed. (1977) Penguin Books.
    14 person liked.
    3 person did not like.
  • ''If the fool would persist in his folly he would become wise.''
    William Blake (1757-1827), British poet, painter, engraver. The Marriage of Heaven and Hell, plate 7, "Proverbs of Hell," (c. 1793), repr. In Complete Writings, ed. Geoffrey Keynes (1957).
    194 person liked.
    102 person did not like.

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Best Poem of William Blake

A Divine Image

Cruelty has a human heart,
And Jealousy a human face;
Terror the human form divine,
And Secresy the human dress.

The human dress is forged iron,
The human form a fiery forge,
The human face a furnace sealed,
The human heart its hungry gorge.

Read the full of A Divine Image

Why Was Cupid A Boy

Why was Cupid a boy,
And why a boy was he?
He should have been a girl,
For aught that I can see.

For he shoots with his bow,
And the girl shoots with her eye,
And they both are merry and glad,
And laugh when we do cry.

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