William Blake

(28 November 1757 – 12 August 1827 / London)

William Blake Quotes

  • ''Bring me my Bow of burning gold:
    Bring me my Arrows of desire:
    Bring me my Spear: O clouds unfold!
    Bring me my Chariot of fire!

    I will not cease from Mental Fight,
    Nor shall my Sword sleep in my hand,
    Till we have built Jerusalem
    In England's green & pleasant Land.''
    William Blake (1757-1827), British poet, painter, mystic. Milton (Plate 1, l. 9-16). . . The Complete Poems [William Blake]. Alicia Ostriker, ed. (1977) Penguin Books.
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  • ''Tiger, Tiger, burning bright
    In the forests of the night,
    What immortal hand or eye
    Could frame thy fearful symmetry?''
    William Blake (1757-1827), British poet, painter, mystic. The Tiger (l. 1-4). . . The Complete Poems [William Blake]. Alicia Ostriker, ed. (1977) Penguin Books.
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  • ''The atoms of Democritus
    And Newton's particles of light
    Are sands upon the Red Sea shore,
    Where Israel's tents do shine so bright.''
    William Blake (1757-1827), British poet, painter, mystic. Mock On, Mock On, Voltaire, Rousseau (l. 9-12). . . The Complete Poems [William Blake]. Alicia Ostriker, ed. (1977) Penguin Books.
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  • ''O thou, with dewy locks, who lookest down
    Through the clear windows of the morning; turn
    Thine angel eyes upon our western isle,
    Which in full choir hails thy approach, O Spring!''
    William Blake (1757-1827), British poet, painter, mystic. To Spring (l. 1-4). . . The Complete Poems [William Blake]. Alicia Ostriker, ed. (1977) Penguin Books.
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  • ''Mock on, mock on, Voltaire, Rousseau!
    Mock on, mock on—'Tis all in vain!''
    William Blake (1757-1827), British poet, painter, mystic. Mock On, Mock On, Voltaire, Rousseau (l. 1-2). . . The Complete Poems [William Blake]. Alicia Ostriker, ed. (1977) Penguin Books.
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  • ''Thou Fair-haired Angel of the Evening,
    Now, whilst the sun rests on the mountains, light
    Thy bright torch of love; thy radiant crown
    Put on, and smile upon our evening bed!''
    William Blake (1757-1827), British poet, painter, mystic. To the Evening Star (l. 1-4). . . The Complete Poems [William Blake]. Alicia Ostriker, ed. (1977) Penguin Books.
    2 person liked.
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  • ''Never seek to tell thy love
    Love that never told can be;''
    William Blake (1757-1827), British poet, painter, mystic. Never Seek to Tell Thy Love (l. 1-2). . . The Complete Poems [William Blake]. Alicia Ostriker, ed. (1977) Penguin Books.
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  • ''Let thy West Wind sleep on
    The lake; speak silence with thy glimmering eyes,
    And wash the dusk with silver.''
    William Blake (1757-1827), British poet, painter, mystic. To the Evening Star (l. 8-10). . . The Complete Poems [William Blake]. Alicia Ostriker, ed. (1977) Penguin Books.
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  • ''I told my love, I told my love,
    I told her all my heart,
    Trembling, cold, in ghastly fears—
    Ah, she doth depart.''
    William Blake (1757-1827), British poet, painter, mystic. Never Seek to Tell Thy Love (l. 5-8). . . The Complete Poems [William Blake]. Alicia Ostriker, ed. (1977) Penguin Books.
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  • ''How have you left the ancient love
    That bards of old enjoyed in you!
    The languid strings do scarcely move!
    The sound is forced, the notes are few!''
    William Blake (1757-1827), British poet, painter, mystic. To the Muses (l. 13-16). . . The Complete Poems [William Blake]. Alicia Ostriker, ed. (1977) Penguin Books.
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Best Poem of William Blake

A Divine Image

Cruelty has a human heart,
And Jealousy a human face;
Terror the human form divine,
And Secresy the human dress.

The human dress is forged iron,
The human form a fiery forge,
The human face a furnace sealed,
The human heart its hungry gorge.

Read the full of A Divine Image

Why Was Cupid A Boy

Why was Cupid a boy,
And why a boy was he?
He should have been a girl,
For aught that I can see.

For he shoots with his bow,
And the girl shoots with her eye,
And they both are merry and glad,
And laugh when we do cry.

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