William Schwenck Gilbert

(1836 - 1911 / London / England)

William Schwenck Gilbert Poems

81. The Englishman 1/1/2004
82. Sir Guy The Crusader 1/1/2004
83. John And Freddy 1/1/2004
84. Thomas Winterbottom Hance 1/1/2004
85. The Suicide's Grave 1/1/2004
86. Lieutenant-Colonel Flare 1/1/2004
87. The Great Oak Tree 1/1/2004
88. Tempora Mutantur 1/1/2004
89. The Highly Respectable Gondolier 1/1/2004
90. Babette's Love 1/1/2004
91. General John 1/1/2004
92. The Pantomime Super To His Mask 1/1/2004
93. Thespis: Act I 1/1/2004
94. Eheu Fugaces -- ! 1/1/2004
95. Little Oliver 1/1/2004
96. At A Pantomime. By A Bilious One 1/1/2004
97. The Policeman's Lot 1/1/2004
98. An English Girl 1/1/2004
99. An Unfortunate Likeness 1/1/2004
100. Gregory Parable, Ll.D. 1/1/2004
101. Only A Dancing Girl 1/1/2004
102. Life Is Lovely All The Year 1/1/2004
103. Hongree And Mahry 1/1/2004
104. King Goodheart 1/1/2004
105. Is Life A Boon 1/1/2004
106. To The Terrestrial Globe 1/1/2004
107. Ferdinando And Elvira 1/1/2004
108. They'Ll None Of 'Em Be Missed 1/1/2004
109. The Aesthete 1/1/2004
110. The Working Monarch 1/1/2004
111. First Love 1/1/2004
112. The Ghost, The Gallant, The Gael, And The Goblin 1/1/2004
113. The Two Ogres 1/1/2004
114. The Darned Mounseer 1/1/2004
115. Annie Protheroe. A Legend Of Stratford-Le-Bow 1/1/2004
116. A Discontented Sugar Broker 1/1/2004
117. Braid The Raven Hair 1/1/2004
118. Girl Graduates 1/1/2004
119. Life 1/1/2004
120. To Phoebe 1/1/2004

Comments about William Schwenck Gilbert

  • Terri Norvell (2/2/2012 7:04:00 PM)

    Absolutely love this verse! Captures the spirit of nature honorably! The Oak holds that space in my heart as well.

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Best Poem of William Schwenck Gilbert

A Classical Revival

At the outset I may mention it's my sovereign intention
To revive the classic memories of Athens at its best,
For my company possesses all the necessary dresses,
And a course of quiet cramming will supply us with the rest.
We've a choir hyporchematic (that is, ballet-operatic)
Who respond to the CHOREUTAE of that cultivated age,
And our clever chorus-master, all but captious criticaster,
Would accept as the CHOREGUS of the early Attic stage.
This return to classic ages is considered in their wages,
Which are always calculated by the day or by the week -
And I'll ...

Read the full of A Classical Revival

Ferdinando And Elvira

PART I.

At a pleasant evening party I had taken down to supper
One whom I will call ELVIRA, and we talked of love and TUPPER,

MR. TUPPER and the Poets, very lightly with them dealing,
For I've always been distinguished for a strong poetic feeling.

Then we let off paper crackers, each of which contained a motto,

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