William Schwenck Gilbert

(1836 - 1911 / London / England)

William Schwenck Gilbert Poems

121. Is Life A Boon 1/1/2004
122. Said I To Myself, Said I 1/1/2004
123. A Recipe 1/1/2004
124. The Disagreeable Man 1/1/2004
125. Good Little Girls 1/1/2004
126. Would You Know? 1/1/2004
127. Willow Waly! 1/1/2004
128. Etiquette 1/1/2004
129. The Modern Major-General 1/1/2004
130. Emily, John, James, And I 1/1/2004
131. The Fairy Curate 1/1/2004
132. The Ape And The Lady 1/1/2004
133. How It's Done 1/1/2004
134. The Fickle Breeze 1/1/2004
135. The Bumboat Woman's Story 1/1/2004
136. A Man Who Would Woo A Fair Maid 1/1/2004
137. Ah Me! 1/1/2004
138. The Coming By-And-By 1/1/2004
139. Don'T Forget! 1/1/2004
140. A Mirage 1/1/2004
141. The Fairy Queen's Song 1/1/2004
142. When I First Put This Uniform On 1/1/2004
143. Brave Alum Bey 1/1/2004
144. The Cunning Woman 1/1/2004
145. Haunted 1/1/2004
146. He And She 1/1/2004
147. A Nightmare 1/1/2004
148. Disillusioned - By An Ex-Enthusiast 1/1/2004
149. Ben Allah Achmet, Or, The Fatal Tum 1/1/2004
150. A Worm Will Turn 1/1/2004
151. Bob Polter 1/1/2004
152. Trial By Jury 1/1/2004
153. Gentle Alice Brown 1/1/2004
154. The Magnet And The Churn 1/1/2004
155. Captain Reece 1/1/2004
156. True Diffidence 1/1/2004
157. The Love-Sick Boy 1/1/2004
158. A Merry Madrigal 1/1/2004
159. Anglicised Utopia 1/1/2004
160. When A Merry Maiden Marries 1/1/2004

Comments about William Schwenck Gilbert

  • Terri Norvell (2/2/2012 7:04:00 PM)

    Absolutely love this verse! Captures the spirit of nature honorably! The Oak holds that space in my heart as well.

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Best Poem of William Schwenck Gilbert

A Classical Revival

At the outset I may mention it's my sovereign intention
To revive the classic memories of Athens at its best,
For my company possesses all the necessary dresses,
And a course of quiet cramming will supply us with the rest.
We've a choir hyporchematic (that is, ballet-operatic)
Who respond to the CHOREUTAE of that cultivated age,
And our clever chorus-master, all but captious criticaster,
Would accept as the CHOREGUS of the early Attic stage.
This return to classic ages is considered in their wages,
Which are always calculated by the day or by the week -
And I'll ...

Read the full of A Classical Revival

The Love-Sick Boy

When first my old, old love I knew,
My bosom welled with joy;
My riches at her feet I threw;
I was a love-sick boy!
No terms seemed too extravagant
Upon her to employ -
I used to mope, and sigh, and pant,
Just like a love-sick boy!

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