William Shakespeare

(26 April 1564 - 23 April 1616 / Warwickshire)

William Shakespeare Quotes

  • ''He loves us not,
    He wants the natural touch. For the poor wren,
    The most diminutive of birds, will fight,
    Her young ones in the nest, against the owl.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Lady Macduff, in Macbeth, act 4, sc. 2, l. 8-11. On Macduff, her husband, who has gone to England, and left her and her child unprotected; "wants the natural touch" means lacks natural affection for his family.
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  • ''There was never yet philosopher
    That could endure the toothache patiently.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Leonato, in Much Ado About Nothing, act 5, sc. 1, l. 35-6. Rejecting his brother's attempt to soothe him.
  • ''Lay on, Macduff,
    And damned be him that first cries, "Hold, enough!"''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Macbeth, in Macbeth, act 5, sc. 8, l. 33-4.
  • ''If you were born to honor, show it now;
    If put upon you, make the judgment good
    That thought you worthy of it.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Marina, in Pericles, act 4, sc. 6, l. 92-4. Held in a brothel, she appeals to Lysimachus not to attempt sex with her.
  • ''Though patience be a tired mare, yet she will plod.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Nym, in Henry V, act 2, sc. 1, l. 23-4.
  • ''Yet I'll not shed her blood,
    Nor scar that whiter skin of hers than snow,
    And smooth as monumental alabaster.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Othello, in Othello, act 5, sc. 2, l. 3-5. Seeing Desdemona as like an effigy in alabaster on a tomb.
  • ''Here's flowers for you:
    Hot lavender, mints, savory, marjoram,
    The marigold, that goes to bed wi'the sun,
    And with him rises, weeping.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Perdita, in The Winter's Tale, act 4, sc. 4, l. 103-6. Giving "Hot" flowers to Polixenes and Camillo as appropriate to older men, perhaps as restorative in some way.
  • ''Let music sound while he doth make his choice;
    Then if he lose he makes a swan-like end,
    Fading in music.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Portia, in The Merchant of Venice, act 3, sc. 2, l. 43-5. The swan was proverbially supposed to sing before dying.
  • ''Never so rich a gem
    Was set in worse than gold.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Prince of Morocco, in The Merchant of Venice, act 2, sc. 7, l. 54-5. Convincing himself that Portia's image will be in the golden casket.
  • ''I am not in the giving vein today.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Richard, in Richard III, act 4, sc. 2, l. 116. Refusing to give Buckingham the reward he promised.

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Best Poem of William Shakespeare

All The World's A Stage

All the world's a stage,
And all the men and women merely players;
They have their exits and their entrances,
And one man in his time plays many parts,
His acts being seven ages. At first, the infant,
Mewling and puking in the nurse's arms.
Then the whining schoolboy, with his satchel
And shining morning face, creeping like snail
Unwillingly to school. And then the lover,
Sighing like furnace, with a woeful ballad
Made to his mistress' eyebrow. Then a soldier,
Full of strange oaths and bearded like the pard,
Jealous in honor, sudden and quick in ...

Read the full of All The World's A Stage

Sonnet Ci

O truant Muse, what shall be thy amends
For thy neglect of truth in beauty dyed?
Both truth and beauty on my love depends;
So dost thou too, and therein dignified.
Make answer, Muse: wilt thou not haply say
'Truth needs no colour, with his colour fix'd;
Beauty no pencil, beauty's truth to lay;
But best is best, if never intermix'd?'
Because he needs no praise, wilt thou be dumb?

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