William Shakespeare

(26 April 1564 - 23 April 1616 / Warwickshire)

William Shakespeare Quotes

  • ''Never so much as in a thought unborn
    Did I offend your Highness.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Rosalind, in As You Like It, act 1, sc. 3, l. 51-2. Accused of treason by her uncle, Rosalind protests her innocence.
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  • ''I am a fellow o'the strangest mind i'the world; I delight in masques and revels sometimes altogether.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Sir Andrew Aguecheek, in Twelfth Night, act 1, sc. 3, l. 112-4. He has just changed his mind about staying in Illyria.
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  • ''Thou hast no more brain than I have in mine elbows.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Thersites, in Troilus and Cressida, act 2, sc. 1, l. 43-4. Insulting the slow-witted Ajax.
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  • ''I'll rhyme you so eight years together, dinners and suppers
    and sleeping-hours excepted.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Touchstone, in As You Like It, act 3, sc. 2, l. 96-7. Mocking Orlando's style of writing love poetry.
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  • ''When in the chronicle of wasted time
    I see descriptions of the fairest wights,
    And beauty making beautiful old rhyme
    In praise of ladies dead and lovely knights,
    Then, in the blazon of sweet beauty's best,
    Of hand, of foot, of lip, of eye, of brow,
    I see their antique pen would have express'd
    Even such a beauty as you master now.
    So all their praises are but prophecies
    Of this our time, all you prefiguring;
    And, for they look'd but with divining eyes,
    They had not skill enough your worth to sing;
    For we, which now behold these present days,
    Have eyes to wonder, but lack tongues to praise.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British poet. When in the chronicle of wasted time (l. 1-14). . . The Unabridged William Shakespeare, William George Clark and William Aldis Wright, eds. (1989) Running Press.
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  • ''My mind is troubled, like a fountain stirred,
    And I myself see not the bottom of it.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Achilles, in Troilus and Cressida, act 3, sc. 3, l. 308-9.
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  • ''They'll take suggestion as a cat laps milk;
    They'll tell the clock to any business that
    We say befits the hour.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Antonio, in The Tempest, act 2, sc. 1, l. 288-90. Referring to all the courtiers except Gonzalo.
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  • ''I told you, sir, they were red-hot with drinking;
    So full of valour that they smote the air,
    For breathing in their faces, beat the ground
    For kissing of their feet.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Ariel, in The Tempest, act 4, sc. 1. Reporting to Prospero of the drunken state in which he left Trinculo, Stefano and Caliban.
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  • ''A man loves the meat in his youth that he cannot endure in his age.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Benedick, in Much Ado About Nothing, act 2, sc. 3, l. 238-40. Justifying his sudden love for Beatrice.
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  • ''You yourself
    Are much condemned to have an itching palm,
    To sell and mart your offices for gold
    To undeservers.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Brutus, in Julius Caesar, act 4, sc. 3, l. 9-12. Accusing Cassius.
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Best Poem of William Shakespeare

O Mistress Mine, Where Are You Roaming? (Twelfth Night, Act Ii, Scene Iii)

O mistress mine, where are you roaming?
O stay and hear! your true-love's coming
That can sing both high and low;
Trip no further, pretty sweeting,
Journey's end in lovers' meeting-
Every wise man's son doth know.

What is love? 'tis not hereafter;
Present mirth hath present laughter;
What's to come is still unsure:
In delay there lies no plenty,-
Then come kiss me, Sweet and twenty,
Youth's a stuff will not endure.

Read the full of O Mistress Mine, Where Are You Roaming? (Twelfth Night, Act Ii, Scene Iii)

Sonnet Ci

O truant Muse, what shall be thy amends
For thy neglect of truth in beauty dyed?
Both truth and beauty on my love depends;
So dost thou too, and therein dignified.
Make answer, Muse: wilt thou not haply say
'Truth needs no colour, with his colour fix'd;
Beauty no pencil, beauty's truth to lay;
But best is best, if never intermix'd?'
Because he needs no praise, wilt thou be dumb?

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