William Shakespeare

(26 April 1564 - 23 April 1616 / Warwickshire)

William Shakespeare Quotes

  • ''The tyrant custom, most grave senators,
    Hath made the flinty and steel couch of war
    My thrice-driven bed of down.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Othello, in Othello, act 1, sc. 3, l. 229-31. As a soldier, he is used to living rough.
    0 person liked.
    0 person did not like.
  • ''There's rosemary and rue. These keep
    Seeming and savor all the winter long.
    Grace and remembrance be to you.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Perdita, in The Winter's Tale, act 4, sc. 4, l. 74-6. Rosemary was an emblem of remembrance, and rue, or "herb grace," of repentance; she gives them to Polixenes and Camillo.
  • ''Come away!
    For you shall hence upon your wedding day.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Portia, in The Merchant of Venice, act 3, sc. 2, l. 310-1. Sending Bassanio off with money to pay his friend Antonio's debts.
  • ''Mislike me not for my complexion,
    The shadowed livery of the burnished sun,
    To whom I am a neighbor and near bred.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Prince of Morocco, in The Merchant of Venice, act 2, sc. 1, l. 1-3. Asking Portia to be color-blind as he is black.
  • ''Tear-falling pity dwells not in this eye.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Richard, in Richard III, act 4, sc. 2, l. 65.
  • ''Men have died from time to time, and worms have eaten them, but not for love.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Rosalind, in As You Like It, act 4, sc. 1, l. 99-101 (1623).
  • ''The task he undertakes
    Is numbering sands and drinking oceans dry.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Sir Henry Green, in Richard II, act 2, sc. 2, l. 145-6. Seeing it is impossible for the old Duke of York to hold back the rebels led by Henry Bolingbroke.
  • ''An honest fellow enough, and one that loves quails, but he has not so much brain as ear-wax.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Thersites, in Troilus and Cressida, act 5, sc. 1, l. 51-3. His description of Agamemnon, the leader of the Greeks.
  • ''Rich honesty dwells like a miser, sir, in a poor house, as
    your pearl in your foul oyster.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Touchstone, in As You Like It, act 5, sc. 4, l. 59-61. Speaking of the sluttish Audrey.
  • ''When my love swears that she is made of truth,
    I do believe her, though I know she lies,
    That she might think me some untutor'd youth,
    Unlearned in the world's false subtleties.
    Thus vainly thinking that she thinks me young,
    Although she knows my days are past the best,
    Simply I credit her false-speaking tongue:
    On both sides thus is simple truth suppress'd.
    But wherefore says she not she is unjust?
    And wherefore say not I that I am old?
    O, love's best habit is in seeming trust,
    And age in love loves not to have years told:
    Therefore I lie with her and she with me,
    And in our faults by lies we flatter'd be.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British poet. When my love swears that she is made of truth (l. 1-14). . . The Unabridged William Shakespeare, William George Clark and William Aldis Wright, eds. (1989) Running Press.

Read more quotations »
Best Poem of William Shakespeare

All The World's A Stage

All the world's a stage,
And all the men and women merely players;
They have their exits and their entrances,
And one man in his time plays many parts,
His acts being seven ages. At first, the infant,
Mewling and puking in the nurse's arms.
Then the whining schoolboy, with his satchel
And shining morning face, creeping like snail
Unwillingly to school. And then the lover,
Sighing like furnace, with a woeful ballad
Made to his mistress' eyebrow. Then a soldier,
Full of strange oaths and bearded like the pard,
Jealous in honor, sudden and quick in ...

Read the full of All The World's A Stage

Sonnet Ci

O truant Muse, what shall be thy amends
For thy neglect of truth in beauty dyed?
Both truth and beauty on my love depends;
So dost thou too, and therein dignified.
Make answer, Muse: wilt thou not haply say
'Truth needs no colour, with his colour fix'd;
Beauty no pencil, beauty's truth to lay;
But best is best, if never intermix'd?'
Because he needs no praise, wilt thou be dumb?

[Report Error]