William Shakespeare

(26 April 1564 - 23 April 1616 / Warwickshire)

William Shakespeare Quotes

  • ''But that I love the gentle Desdemona,
    I would not my unhousèd free condition
    Put into circumscription and confine
    For the sea's worth.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Othello, in Othello, act 1, sc. 2, l. 25-8. As a soldier Othello has no house or domestic life; "circumscription" means restriction; Othello is fond of such big words, that here make marriage sound a little like imprisonment.
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  • ''Pericles. He asks of you that never used to beg.
    1st Fisherman. No, friend, cannot you beg? Here's them in our country of Greece gets more with begging than we can do with working.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Pericles and 1st Fisherman, in Pericles, act 2, sc. 1, l. 62-5. Pericles, cast up on shore by a storm, begs the fishermen to help him.
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  • ''If you do love me, you will find me out.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Portia, in The Merchant of Venice, act 3, sc. 2, l. 41. Meaning that Bassanio will choose the right casket.
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  • ''Here do I choose, and thrive I as I may!''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Prince of Morocco, in The Merchant of Venice, act 2, sc. 7, l. 60. Choosing the golden casket in the hope of winning Portia.
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  • ''The sweet silent hours of marriage joys.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Richard, in Richard III, act 4, sc. 4, l. 330. Trying to persuade Queen Elizabeth that he is a fit suitor for her daughter's hand.
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  • ''I will not cast away my physic but on those that are sick.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Rosalind, in As You Like It, act 3, sc. 2, l. 358-9.
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  • ''I were better to be eaten to death with a rust than to be scoured to nothing with perpetual motion.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Sir John Falstaff, in Henry IV pt. 2, act 1, sc. 2, l. 219-21 (1600).
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  • ''All the argument is a whore and a cuckold, a good quarrel to draw emulous factions and bleed to death upon!''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Thersites, in Troilus and Cressida, act 2, sc. 3, l. 72-4. A cynic's view of the Trojan war; Helen is the "whore," and Menelaus the "cuckold"; "draw" = attract.
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  • ''If a hart do lack a hind,
    Let him seek out Rosalind.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Touchstone, in As You Like It, act 3, sc. 2, l. 101-2. Parodying Orlando's verses to Rosalind.
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  • ''Why didst thou promise such a beauteous day,
    And make me travel forth without my cloak,
    To let base clouds o'ertake me in my way,''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British poet. Why didst thou promise such a beauteous day (l. 1-4). OBSC. The Unabridged William Shakespeare, William George Clark and William Aldis Wright, eds. (1989) Running Press.
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Best Poem of William Shakespeare

O Mistress Mine, Where Are You Roaming? (Twelfth Night, Act Ii, Scene Iii)

O mistress mine, where are you roaming?
O stay and hear! your true-love's coming
That can sing both high and low;
Trip no further, pretty sweeting,
Journey's end in lovers' meeting-
Every wise man's son doth know.

What is love? 'tis not hereafter;
Present mirth hath present laughter;
What's to come is still unsure:
In delay there lies no plenty,-
Then come kiss me, Sweet and twenty,
Youth's a stuff will not endure.

Read the full of O Mistress Mine, Where Are You Roaming? (Twelfth Night, Act Ii, Scene Iii)

Sonnet Ci

O truant Muse, what shall be thy amends
For thy neglect of truth in beauty dyed?
Both truth and beauty on my love depends;
So dost thou too, and therein dignified.
Make answer, Muse: wilt thou not haply say
'Truth needs no colour, with his colour fix'd;
Beauty no pencil, beauty's truth to lay;
But best is best, if never intermix'd?'
Because he needs no praise, wilt thou be dumb?

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