William Shakespeare

(26 April 1564 - 23 April 1616 / Warwickshire)

William Shakespeare Quotes

  • ''Why hast thou lost the fresh blood in thy cheeks,
    And given my treasures and my rights of thee
    To thick-eyed musing and cursed melancholy?''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Lady Percy, in Henry IV, Part 1, act 2, sc. 3, l. 46. Her husband, Hotspur, has not told her he is involved in plans for a rebellion against the king.
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  • ''How much better is it to weep at joy than to joy at weeping!''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Leonato, in Much Ado About Nothing, act 1, sc. 1, l. 27-9. On Claudio's uncle, who weeps for joy that his nephew is safe.
  • ''What, will the line stretch out to the crack of doom?''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Macbeth, in Macbeth, act 4, sc. 1, l. 117. Referring to the line of Banquo's descendants; "crack of doom" means the peal of thunder on judgment day.
  • ''For I have neither wit, nor words, nor worth,
    Action, nor utterance, nor the power of speech,
    To stir men's blood. I only speak right on.
    I tell you that which you yourselves do know.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Mark Antony, in Julius Caesar, act 3, sc. 2.
  • ''Ill met by moonlight, proud Titania!''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Oberon, in A Midsummer Night's Dream, act 2, sc. 1, l. 60. The first meeting between the King and Queen of Fairies.
  • ''I know thou'rt full of love and honesty,
    And weigh'st thy words before thou giv'st them breath.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Othello, in Othello, act 3, sc. 3, l. 118-9. Iago has convinced everyone of his honesty.
  • ''Simonides. And she is fair too, is she not?
    Pericles. As a fair day in summer, wondrous fair.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Pericles, in Pericles, act 2, sc. 5, l. 36. Commenting on Thaisa, the daughter of Simonides.
  • ''How many things by season seasoned are
    To their right praise and true perfection!''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Portia, in The Merchant of Venice, act 5, sc. 1, l. 107-8. "By season" means by fit occasion, playing on the notion of seasoning.
  • ''"Who chooseth me shall get as much as he deserves."
    And well said too; for who shall go about
    To cozen fortune, and be honorable
    Without the stamp of merit?''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Prince of Morocco, in The Merchant of Venice, act 2, sc. 9, l. 36-9. Looking at the silver casket in the hope that he will cheat ("cozen") fortune because he has the seal of approval ("stamp of merit") in being an aristocrat.
  • ''Look what is done cannot be now amended:
    Men shall deal unadvisedly sometimes,
    Which after-hours gives leisure to repent.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Richard, in Richard III, act 4, sc. 4, l. 291-3. Trying to excuse his murder of Queen Elizabeth's relatives; proverbial (what's done cannot be undone).

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Best Poem of William Shakespeare

All The World's A Stage

All the world's a stage,
And all the men and women merely players;
They have their exits and their entrances,
And one man in his time plays many parts,
His acts being seven ages. At first, the infant,
Mewling and puking in the nurse's arms.
Then the whining schoolboy, with his satchel
And shining morning face, creeping like snail
Unwillingly to school. And then the lover,
Sighing like furnace, with a woeful ballad
Made to his mistress' eyebrow. Then a soldier,
Full of strange oaths and bearded like the pard,
Jealous in honor, sudden and quick in ...

Read the full of All The World's A Stage

Sonnet Li

Thus can my love excuse the slow offence
Of my dull bearer when from thee I speed:
From where thou art why should I haste me thence?
Till I return, of posting is no need.
O, what excuse will my poor beast then find,
When swift extremity can seem but slow?
Then should I spur, though mounted on the wind;
In winged speed no motion shall I know:
Then can no horse with my desire keep pace;

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