William Shakespeare

(26 April 1564 - 23 April 1616 / Warwickshire)

William Shakespeare Quotes

  • ''He reads much,
    He is a great observer, and he looks
    Quite through the deeds of men.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Caesar, in Julius Caesar, act 1, sc. 2, l. 202-3. On Cassius.
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  • ''I am armed,
    And dangers are to me indifferent.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Cassius, in Julius Caesar, act 1, sc. 3, l. 114-5. "Indifferent" means immaterial.
  • ''Though yet of Hamlet our dear brother's death
    The memory be green.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Claudius, in Hamlet, act 1, sc. 2, l. 1-2. "Green" means fresh; he has been dead two months.
  • ''Come leave your tears: a brief farewell. The beast
    With many heads butts me away.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Coriolanus, in Coriolanus, act 4, sc. 1, l. 1-2. Coriolanus bids his wife farewell as he goes from Rome, banished by the people (the "beast with many heads").
  • ''If I can cross him any way, I bless myself every way.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Don John, in Much Ado About Nothing, act 1, sc. 3, l. 67-8. Referring to Claudio, whom he hates; "cross" means thwart, punning also on making the sign of the cross, so leading into "bless."
  • ''I grow, I prosper:
    Now, gods, stand up for bastards!''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Edmund, in King Lear, act 1, sc. 2, l. 21-2.
  • ''I can get no remedy against this consumption of the purse;
    borrowing only lingers and lingers it out, but the disease
    is incurable.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Falstaff, in Henry IV, Part 2, act 1, sc. 2, l. 236-8.
  • ''Adversity's sweet milk, philosophy,
    To comfort thee, though thou art banishèd.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Friar Lawrence, in Romeo and Juliet, act 3, sc. 3, l. 55-6. Seeking to comfort the banished Romeo.
  • ''No exorciser harm thee.
    Nor no witchcraft charm thee.
    Ghost unlaid forbear thee.
    Nothing ill come near thee.
    Quiet consummation have,
    And renowned be thy grave.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Guiderius and Arviragus, in Cymbeline, act 4, sc. 2, l. 276-81. Last stanza of a song of mourning for Fidele (really Imogen in disguise) supposed dead.
  • ''The satirical rogue says here that old men have grey beards,
    that their faces are wrinkled, their eyes purging thick amber
    and plum-tree gum, and that they have a plentiful lack of wit,
    together with most weak hams.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Hamlet, in Hamlet, act 2, sc. 2, l. 196-200. Mocking the aging Polonius by pretending to quote from a book he is reading.

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Best Poem of William Shakespeare

All The World's A Stage

All the world's a stage,
And all the men and women merely players;
They have their exits and their entrances,
And one man in his time plays many parts,
His acts being seven ages. At first, the infant,
Mewling and puking in the nurse's arms.
Then the whining schoolboy, with his satchel
And shining morning face, creeping like snail
Unwillingly to school. And then the lover,
Sighing like furnace, with a woeful ballad
Made to his mistress' eyebrow. Then a soldier,
Full of strange oaths and bearded like the pard,
Jealous in honor, sudden and quick in ...

Read the full of All The World's A Stage

Sonnet Lxvi

Tired with all these, for restful death I cry,
As, to behold desert a beggar born,
And needy nothing trimm'd in jollity,
And purest faith unhappily forsworn,
And guilded honour shamefully misplaced,
And maiden virtue rudely strumpeted,
And right perfection wrongfully disgraced,
And strength by limping sway disabled,
And art made tongue-tied by authority,

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