William Shakespeare

(26 April 1564 - 23 April 1616 / Warwickshire)

William Shakespeare Quotes

  • ''Now cracks a noble heart. Good night, sweet prince,
    And flights of angels sing thee to thy rest!''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Horatio, in Hamlet, act 5, sc. 2, l. 359-60. On Hamlet's death; "flights of angels sing" means may flights of angels sing.
    0 person liked.
    0 person did not like.
  • ''Pleasure and action make the hours seem short.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Iago, in Othello, act 2, sc. 3, l. 379.
    0 person liked.
    0 person did not like.
  • ''Although I joy in thee,
    I have no joy of this contract tonight.
    It is too rash, too unadvised, too sudden,
    Too like the lightning which doth cease to be
    Ere one can say it lightens.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Juliet, in Romeo and Juliet, act 2, sc. 2, l. 116-20. To Romeo; she already has a premonition that their love may not last.
    0 person liked.
    0 person did not like.
  • ''Peace to this meeting, wherefore we are met.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. King Henry, in Henry V, act 5, sc. 2, l. 1. The meeting is to settle peace between England and France.
    0 person liked.
    0 person did not like.
  • ''O, reason not the need! Our basest beggars
    Are in the poorest thing superfluous.
    Allow not nature more than nature needs,
    Man's life is cheap as beast's. Thou art a lady;
    If only to go warm were gorgeous,
    Why, nature needs not what thou gorgeous wear'st,
    Which scarcely keeps thee warm. But, for true need—
    You heavens, give me that patience, patience I need!''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British poet. King Lear (II, iv). OHFP. The Unabridged William Shakespeare, William George Clark and William Aldis Wright, eds. (1989) Running Press.
    0 person liked.
    0 person did not like.
  • ''The hideous god of war.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Lady Percy, in Henry IV, Part 2, act 2, sc. 3, l. 35. Mars seems hideous now that Lady Percy's husband has been killed in battle.
    0 person liked.
    0 person did not like.
  • ''Men
    Can counsel and speak comfort to that grief
    Which they themselves not feel; but, tasting it,
    Their counsel turns to passion.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Leonato, in Much Ado About Nothing, act 5, sc. 1, l. 20-3. It is easy to advise others who are suffering, but hard for those in pain to accept counsel.
    0 person liked.
    0 person did not like.
  • ''This Duncan
    Hath borne his faculties so meek, hath been
    So clear in his great office, that his virtues
    Will plead like angels, trumpet-tongued, against
    The deep damnation of his taking-off.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Macbeth, in Macbeth, act 1, sc. 7, l. 16-20. Duncan has wielded power so mildly ("meek"), and been blameless ("clear") as king, hence the "deep damnation" of killing him.
    0 person liked.
    0 person did not like.
  • ''I come to bury Caesar, not to praise him.
    The evil that men do lives after them;
    The good is oft interrèd with their bones.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Mark Antony, in Julius Caesar, act 3, sc. 2. From Mark Antony's funeral oration for Julius Caesar.
    0 person liked.
    0 person did not like.
  • ''Now thou and I are new in amity.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Reconciled to his queen, Titania. Oberon, in A Midsummer Night's Dream, act 4, sc. 1, l. 87.
    0 person liked.
    0 person did not like.

Read more quotations »
Best Poem of William Shakespeare

O Mistress Mine, Where Are You Roaming? (Twelfth Night, Act Ii, Scene Iii)

O mistress mine, where are you roaming?
O stay and hear! your true-love's coming
That can sing both high and low;
Trip no further, pretty sweeting,
Journey's end in lovers' meeting-
Every wise man's son doth know.

What is love? 'tis not hereafter;
Present mirth hath present laughter;
What's to come is still unsure:
In delay there lies no plenty,-
Then come kiss me, Sweet and twenty,
Youth's a stuff will not endure.

Read the full of O Mistress Mine, Where Are You Roaming? (Twelfth Night, Act Ii, Scene Iii)

Sonnet Cviii

What's in the brain that ink may character
Which hath not figured to thee my true spirit?
What's new to speak, what new to register,
That may express my love or thy dear merit?
Nothing, sweet boy; but yet, like prayers divine,
I must, each day say o'er the very same,
Counting no old thing old, thou mine, I thine,
Even as when first I hallow'd thy fair name.
So that eternal love in love's fresh case

[Report Error]