William Shakespeare

(26 April 1564 - 23 April 1616 / Warwickshire)

William Shakespeare Quotes

  • ''My age is as a lusty winter,
    Frosty but kindly.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Adam, in As You Like It, act 2, sc. 3.
    0 person liked.
    0 person did not like.
  • ''In nature there's no blemish but the mind;
    None can be called deformed but the unkind.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Antonio, in Twelfth Night, act 3, sc. 4, l. 367-8. Mistaking Cesario (Viola) for Sebastian, he accuses him/her of being unnatural and ungrateful ("unkind").
    0 person liked.
    0 person did not like.
  • ''His tears run down his beard like winter's drops
    From eaves of reeds.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Ariel, in The Tempest, act 5, sc. 1, l. 16-7. Referring to old Gonzalo, whose tears show his pity for the madness afflicting Alonso.
    0 person liked.
    0 person did not like.
  • ''He was wont to speak plain and to the purpose, like an honest man and a soldier, and now is he turned orthography; his words are a very fantastical banquet, just so many strange dishes.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Benedick, in Much Ado About Nothing, act 2, sc. 3, l. 18-21. On Claudio's rhetorical flourishes now he has become a lover; "turned orthography" means become pedantic.
    0 person liked.
    0 person did not like.
  • ''Let me tell you, Cassius, you yourself
    Are much condemn'd to have an itching palm.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Brutus, in Julius Caesar, act 4, sc. 2.
    0 person liked.
    0 person did not like.
  • ''See, Antony, that revels long a-nights,
    Is notwithstanding up.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Caesar, in Julius Caesar, act 2, sc. 2, l. 116-7. Greeting Antony.
    0 person liked.
    0 person did not like.
  • ''Since you know you cannot see yourself
    So well as by reflection, I, your glass,
    Will modestly discover to yourself
    That of yourself which yet you know not of.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Cassius, in Julius Caesar, act 1, sc. 2, l. 67-70. Telling Brutus he can, like a mirror ("glass") reveal discreetly ("modestly discover") what Brutus fails to understand about himself.
    1 person liked.
    0 person did not like.
  • ''When sorrows come they come not single spies,
    But in battalions.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Claudius, in Hamlet, act 4, sc. 5, l. 76-7 (1604).
    0 person liked.
    0 person did not like.
  • ''You common cry of curs, whose breath I hate
    As reek a'th'rotten fens, whose loves I prize
    As the dead carcasses of unburied men
    That do corrupt my air—I banish you!''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Coriolanus, in Coriolanus, act 3, sc. 3, l. 120-3. Sicinius, a tribune of the people, has just declared that Coriolanus should be banished.
    0 person liked.
    0 person did not like.
  • ''Don Pedro. You have put him down, lady, you have put him down.
    Beatrice. So I would not he should do me, my lord, lest I should prove the mother of fools.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Don Pedro and Beatrice, in Much Ado About Nothing, act 2, sc. 1, l. 283-6. Beatrice has outsmarted Benedick, but she jokingly takes "put him down" literally.
    0 person liked.
    0 person did not like.

Read more quotations »
Best Poem of William Shakespeare

Fear No More

Fear no more the heat o' the sun;
Nor the furious winter's rages,
Thou thy worldly task hast done,
Home art gone, and ta'en thy wages;
Golden lads and girls all must,
As chimney sweepers come to dust.

Fear no more the frown of the great,
Thou art past the tyrant's stroke:
Care no more to clothe and eat;
To thee the reed is as the oak:
The sceptre, learning, physic, must
All follow this, and come to dust.

Fear no more the lightning-flash,
Nor the all-dread thunder-stone;
Fear not slander, censure rash;
Thou hast finished joy ...

Read the full of Fear No More

Sonnet Li

Thus can my love excuse the slow offence
Of my dull bearer when from thee I speed:
From where thou art why should I haste me thence?
Till I return, of posting is no need.
O, what excuse will my poor beast then find,
When swift extremity can seem but slow?
Then should I spur, though mounted on the wind;
In winged speed no motion shall I know:
Then can no horse with my desire keep pace;