William Shakespeare

(26 April 1564 - 23 April 1616 / Warwickshire)

William Shakespeare Quotes

  • ''The wheel is come full circle.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Edmund, in King Lear, act 5, sc. 3, l. 175. I.e., fortune's wheel, ever turning.
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  • ''Do not speak like a death's-head, do not bid me remember mine end.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Falstaff, in Henry IV, Part 2, act 2, sc. 4, l. 234-5. "Death's head" means skull, used as a memento mori or reminder that death awaits everyone.
  • ''Yet seemed it winter still, and, you away,
    As with your shadow I with these did play.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British poet. From you have I been absent in the spring (l. 13-14). . . The Unabridged William Shakespeare, William George Clark and William Aldis Wright, eds. (1989) Running Press.
  • ''Guiderius and Arviragus. All lovers young, all
    lovers must
    Consign to thee and come to dust.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Guiderius and Arviragus, in Cymbeline, act 4, sc. 2, l. 270-5. Mourning Fidele (the disguised Imogen), supposed dead; "thee" means death.
  • ''I do not set my life at a pin's fee,
    And for my soul, what can it do to that,
    Being a thing immortal as itself?''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Hamlet, in Hamlet, act 1, sc. 4, l. 65-7. Determined to follow the ghost, not knowing whether it is a good or evil spirit; "fee" means worth.
  • ''So shall you hear
    Of carnal, bloody, and unnatural acts,
    Of accidental judgments, casual slaughters,
    Of deaths put on by cunning and forced cause,
    And in this upshot, purposes mistook
    Fallen on th'inventors' heads.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Horatio, in Hamlet, act 5, sc. 2, l. 380-5. Summing up his version of the events.
  • ''How poor are they that have not patience!
    What wound did ever heal but by degrees?''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Iago, in Othello, act 2, sc. 3, l. 370-1. "He that has no patience has nothing" is proverbial.
  • ''Parting is such sweet sorrow
    That I shall say good night till it be morrow.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Juliet, in Romeo and Juliet, act 2, sc. 1, l. 229-30 (1599).
  • ''Treason and murder ever kept together,
    As two yoke-devils sworn to either's purpose.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. King Henry, in Henry V, act 2, sc. 2, l. 105-6. "Yoke-devils" means devils in partnership, yoked together.
  • ''Thou must be patient. We came crying hither.
    Thou know'st the first time that we smell the air
    We wawl and cry.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British poet. King Lear (IV, vi). OHFP. The Unabridged William Shakespeare, William George Clark and William Aldis Wright, eds. (1989) Running Press.

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Best Poem of William Shakespeare

All The World's A Stage

All the world's a stage,
And all the men and women merely players;
They have their exits and their entrances,
And one man in his time plays many parts,
His acts being seven ages. At first, the infant,
Mewling and puking in the nurse's arms.
Then the whining schoolboy, with his satchel
And shining morning face, creeping like snail
Unwillingly to school. And then the lover,
Sighing like furnace, with a woeful ballad
Made to his mistress' eyebrow. Then a soldier,
Full of strange oaths and bearded like the pard,
Jealous in honor, sudden and quick in ...

Read the full of All The World's A Stage

Sonnet Li

Thus can my love excuse the slow offence
Of my dull bearer when from thee I speed:
From where thou art why should I haste me thence?
Till I return, of posting is no need.
O, what excuse will my poor beast then find,
When swift extremity can seem but slow?
Then should I spur, though mounted on the wind;
In winged speed no motion shall I know:
Then can no horse with my desire keep pace;

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