William Shakespeare

(26 April 1564 - 23 April 1616 / Warwickshire)

William Shakespeare Quotes

  • ''O yet for God's sake, go not to these wars!''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Lady Percy, in Henry IV, Part 2, act 2, sc. 3, l. 9. Hotspur's widow begs her father-in-law not to fight.
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  • ''She, O, she is fallen
    Into a pit of ink, that the wide sea
    Hath drops too few to wash her clean again
    And salt too little which may season give
    To her foul tainted flesh!''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Leonato, in Much Ado About Nothing, act 4, sc. 1, l. 139-43. Believing his daughter to have been unchaste; "season give" means make sound again (literally, give relish to, like salt).
  • ''I am settled, and bend up
    Each corporal agent to this terrible feat.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Macbeth, in Macbeth, act 1, sc. 7, l. 80-1. "Bend up" means brace every nerve in my body (from bringing a bow into tension); he is ready to murder Duncan (the "terrible feat").
  • ''Run to your houses, fall upon your knees,
    Pray to the gods to intermit the plague
    That needs must light on this ingratitude.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Marullus, in Julius Caesar, act 1, sc. 1, l. 53-5. Addressing working men who have come to see Caesar, and have forgotten Pompey (hence their "ingratitude").
  • ''That very time I saw (but thou couldst not)
    Flying between the cold moon and the earth
    Cupid all armed.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Oberon, in A Midsummer Night's Dream, act 2, sc. 1, l. 155-7. Speaking to Puck; the cold moon symbolizes chastity (the goddess Diana).
  • ''All my fond love thus do I blow to heaven
    'Tis gone.
    Arise, black vengeance, from the hollow hell!''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Othello, in Othello, act 3, sc. 3, l. 445-7. The turning point, as his love for Desdemona turns to hate.
  • ''Yet cease your ire, you angry stars of heaven!
    Wind, rain, and thunder, remember earthly man
    Is but a substance that must yield to you.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Pericles, in Pericles, act 2, sc. 1, l. 1-3. Seeing the storm that has shipwrecked him as marking the anger of the heavens.
  • ''By my troth, Nerissa, my little body is aweary of this great world.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Portia, in The Merchant of Venice, act 1, sc. 2, l. 1-2. Portia's first words in the play.
  • ''Thou shalt be as free
    As mountain winds; but then exactly do
    All points of my command.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Prospero, in The Tempest, act 1, sc. 2, l. 499-501. Promising Ariel his liberty, but demanding obedience.
  • ''A horse! A horse! My kingdom for a horse!''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Richard, in Richard III, act 5, sc. 7, l. 7 and 13 (1597). Richard's last words at the Battle of Bosworth.

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Best Poem of William Shakespeare

All The World's A Stage

All the world's a stage,
And all the men and women merely players;
They have their exits and their entrances,
And one man in his time plays many parts,
His acts being seven ages. At first, the infant,
Mewling and puking in the nurse's arms.
Then the whining schoolboy, with his satchel
And shining morning face, creeping like snail
Unwillingly to school. And then the lover,
Sighing like furnace, with a woeful ballad
Made to his mistress' eyebrow. Then a soldier,
Full of strange oaths and bearded like the pard,
Jealous in honor, sudden and quick in ...

Read the full of All The World's A Stage

Sonnet Lxvi

Tired with all these, for restful death I cry,
As, to behold desert a beggar born,
And needy nothing trimm'd in jollity,
And purest faith unhappily forsworn,
And guilded honour shamefully misplaced,
And maiden virtue rudely strumpeted,
And right perfection wrongfully disgraced,
And strength by limping sway disabled,
And art made tongue-tied by authority,

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