William Shakespeare

(26 April 1564 - 23 April 1616 / Warwickshire)

William Shakespeare Quotes

  • ''That same wicked bastard of Venus that was begot of thought,
    conceived of spleen, and born of madness, that blind
    rascally boy that abuses every one's eyes because his own
    are out, let him be judge how deep I am in love.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Rosalind, in As You Like It, act 4, sc. 1, l. 211-5. Bastard of Venus means Cupid.
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  • ''Lord, Lord, how this world is given to lying!''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Sir John Oldcastle (Falstaff), in Henry IV pt. 1, act 5, sc. 4, l. 142-43 (1598). Oldcastle (Falstaff) laments the dishonesty of the world when his false claim to have dispatched Hotspur is shown up.
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  • ''The plague of Greece upon thee, thou mongrel beef-witted lord!''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Thersites, in Troilus and Cressida, act 2, sc. 1, l. 12-13. Bandying insults with Ajax; a diet of beef was thought to make people stupid.
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  • ''A poor virgin, sir, an ill-favored thing, sir, but mine own.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Touchstone, in As You Like It, act 5, sc. 4, l. 57-8. Introducing the sluttish Audrey to Jaques.
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  • ''A good old commander and a most kind gentleman.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Williams, in Henry V, act 4, sc. 1, l. 95-6. On Sir Thomas Erpingham.
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  • ''I will follow thee
    To the last gasp with truth and loyalty.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Adam, in As You Like It, act 2, sc. 3, l. 69-70.
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  • ''Beguile the time, and feed your knowledge
    With viewing of the town.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Antonio, in Twelfth Night, act 3, sc. 3, l. 41-2. Urging Sebastian to look around Illyria.
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  • ''The naked truth of it is, I have no shirt; I go woolward for penance.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Armado, in Love's Labor's Lost, act 5, sc. 2, l. 710. Concealing his poverty by claiming he is doing penance, and so wears no linen beneath his outer clothes.
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  • ''You are a villain. I jest not. I will make it good how you dare, with what you dare, and when you dare.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Benedick, in Much Ado About Nothing, act 5, sc. 1, l. 146-7. Challenging Claudio to fight.
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  • ''Between the acting of a dreadful thing
    And the first motion, all the interim is
    Like a phantasma or a hideous dream.
    The genius and the mortal instruments
    Are then in council, and the state of man,
    Like to a little kingdom, suffers then
    The nature of an insurrection.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Brutus, in Julius Caesar, act 2, sc. 1, l. 63-9. A marvelous expression of a tormented mind living as it were an hallucination ("phantasma"), while the soul ("genius") on the one hand, and the mental and physical functions of the body on the other, are at odds.
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Best Poem of William Shakespeare

Shall I Compare Thee To A Summer's Day? (Sonnet 18)

Shall I compare thee to a summer's day?
Thou art more lovely and more temperate.
Rough winds do shake the darling buds of May,
And summer's lease hath all too short a date.
Sometime too hot the eye of heaven shines,
And often is his gold complexion dimmed;
And every fair from fair sometime declines,
By chance, or nature's changing course, untrimmed;
But thy eternal summer shall not fade,
Nor lose possession of that fair thou ow'st,
Nor shall death brag thou wand'rest in his shade,
When in eternal lines to Time thou grow'st.
So long as men can breathe, or ...

Read the full of Shall I Compare Thee To A Summer's Day? (Sonnet 18)

Sonnet Ci

O truant Muse, what shall be thy amends
For thy neglect of truth in beauty dyed?
Both truth and beauty on my love depends;
So dost thou too, and therein dignified.
Make answer, Muse: wilt thou not haply say
'Truth needs no colour, with his colour fix'd;
Beauty no pencil, beauty's truth to lay;
But best is best, if never intermix'd?'
Because he needs no praise, wilt thou be dumb?

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