William Shakespeare

(26 April 1564 - 23 April 1616 / Warwickshire)

William Shakespeare Quotes

  • ''Know, Caesar doth not wrong, nor without cause
    Will he be satisfied.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Caesar, in Julius Caesar, act 3, sc. 1, l. 47-8. To Metellus, whose brother has been exiled.
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  • ''Since the affairs of men rest still incertain,
    Let's reason with the worst that may befall.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Cassius, in Julius Caesar, act 5, sc. 1, l. 95-6. Contemplating battle; "reason" means reckon.
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  • ''Diseases desperate grown
    By desperate appliance are relieved,
    Or not at all.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Claudius, in Hamlet, act 4, sc. 3, l. 9-11. Proverbial.
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  • ''Despising,
    For you, the city, thus I turn my back;
    There is a world elsewhere.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Coriolanus, in Coriolanus, act 3, sc. 3, l. 133-5. Coriolanus is banished by the people of Rome.
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  • ''Don Pedro. To be merry best becomes you; for, out o' question, you were born in a merry hour.
    Beatrice. No, sure, my lord, my mother cried; but then there was a star danced, and under than was I born.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Don Pedro and Beatrice, in Much Ado About Nothing, act 2, sc. 1, l. 331-5. The stars were thought to influence temperament.
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  • ''A heavier task could not have been imposed
    Than I to speak my griefs unspeakable.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Egeon, in The Comedy of Errors, act 1, sc. 1, l. 31-2. Beginning the story of how he was separated from his wife and one of their twin sons.
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  • ''The second property of your excellent sherris is the warming
    of the blood.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Falstaff, in Henry IV, Part 2, act 4, sc. 3, l. 102-3. Drinking wine or sherry was thought to heat the blood.
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  • ''From you have I been absent in the spring,
    When proud pied April, dressed in all his trim,
    Hath put a spirit of youth in every thing,
    That heavy Saturn laughed and leaped with him.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British poet. From you have I been absent in the spring (l. 1-4). . . The Unabridged William Shakespeare, William George Clark and William Aldis Wright, eds. (1989) Running Press.
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  • ''But his neat cookery! He cut our roots in characters,
    And sauced our broths, as Juno had been sick
    And he her dieter.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Guiderius, in Cymbeline, act 4, sc. 2, l. 49-51. Speaking of Imogen, in disguise as a youth, making a meal fit for the gods; "characters" means letters.
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  • ''The purpose of playing, whose end, both at the first and now,
    was and is, to hold as 'twere the mirror up to nature: to show
    virtue her feature, scorn her own image, and the very age and
    body of the time his form and pressure.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Hamlet, in Hamlet, act 3, sc. 2, l. 20-4. Hamlet's advice to the actors has its origins in classical rhetoric; they are to show plainly the appearance (feature) of virtue and of vice, and reflect the present state of affairs; "pressure" means impression, as if in wax.
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Best Poem of William Shakespeare

Fear No More

Fear no more the heat o' the sun;
Nor the furious winter's rages,
Thou thy worldly task hast done,
Home art gone, and ta'en thy wages;
Golden lads and girls all must,
As chimney sweepers come to dust.

Fear no more the frown of the great,
Thou art past the tyrant's stroke:
Care no more to clothe and eat;
To thee the reed is as the oak:
The sceptre, learning, physic, must
All follow this, and come to dust.

Fear no more the lightning-flash,
Nor the all-dread thunder-stone;
Fear not slander, censure rash;
Thou hast finished joy ...

Read the full of Fear No More

Sonnet Ci

O truant Muse, what shall be thy amends
For thy neglect of truth in beauty dyed?
Both truth and beauty on my love depends;
So dost thou too, and therein dignified.
Make answer, Muse: wilt thou not haply say
'Truth needs no colour, with his colour fix'd;
Beauty no pencil, beauty's truth to lay;
But best is best, if never intermix'd?'
Because he needs no praise, wilt thou be dumb?

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