William Shakespeare

(26 April 1564 - 23 April 1616 / Warwickshire)

William Shakespeare Quotes

  • ''Unregarded age in corners thrown.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Adam, in As You Like It, act 2, sc. 3, l. 42.
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  • ''Sometimes we see a cloud that's dragonish,
    A vapor sometimes like a bear or lion,
    A towered citadel, a pendant rock,
    A forked mountain, or blue promontory
    With trees upon 't that nod unto the world
    And mock our eyes with air. Thou hast seen these signs;
    They are black vesper's pageants.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British poet. Antony and Cleopatra (IV, xiv). . . The Unabridged William Shakespeare, William George Clark and William Aldis Wright, eds. (1989) Running Press.
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  • ''Devise, wit; write, pen; for I am for whole volumes in folio.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Armado, in Love's Labor's Lost, act 1, sc. 2, l. 184-5. To express his love for the country wench, Jaquenetta.
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  • ''Rich she shall be, that's certain; wise, or I'll none; virtuous, or I'll never cheapen her; fair, or I'll never look on her; mild, or come not near me; noble, or not I for an angel; of good discourse, an excellent musician, and her hair shall be of what color it please God.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Benedick, in Much Ado About Nothing, act 2, sc. 3, l. 30-5. Admitting after all that he could care for a woman—if she has all the graces.
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  • ''Who is here so base that would be a bondman? If any, speak, for him have I offended. Who is here so rude that would not be a Roman? If any, speak, for him have I offended. Who is here so vile that will not love his country? If any, speak, for him have I offended.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Brutus, in Julius Caesar, act 3, sc. 2, l. 29-34. To the people, after the death of Caesar.
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  • ''What can be avoided
    Whose end is purposed by the mighty gods?''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Caesar, in Julius Caesar, act 2, sc. 2, l. 26-7.
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  • ''Urge me no more, I shall forget myself.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Cassius, in Julius Caesar, act 4, sc. 3, l. 35. To Brutus; "urge" means provoke.
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  • ''My words fly up, my thoughts remain below:
    Words without thoughts never to heaven go.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Claudius, in Hamlet, act 3, sc. 3, l. 97-8. Finding his prayers for forgiveness are ineffective.
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  • ''Would you have me
    False to my nature? Rather say, I play
    The man I am.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Coriolanus, in Coriolanus, act 3, sc. 2, l. 14-6.
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  • ''Don Pedro. Will you have me, lady?
    Beatrice. No, my lord, unless I might have another for working-days: your grace is too costly to wear every day.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Don Pedro and Beatrice, in Much Ado About Nothing, act 2, sc. 1, l. 326-9. Beatrice neatly turns aside the offer of the Prince of Aragon.
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Best Poem of William Shakespeare

Fear No More

Fear no more the heat o' the sun;
Nor the furious winter's rages,
Thou thy worldly task hast done,
Home art gone, and ta'en thy wages;
Golden lads and girls all must,
As chimney sweepers come to dust.

Fear no more the frown of the great,
Thou art past the tyrant's stroke:
Care no more to clothe and eat;
To thee the reed is as the oak:
The sceptre, learning, physic, must
All follow this, and come to dust.

Fear no more the lightning-flash,
Nor the all-dread thunder-stone;
Fear not slander, censure rash;
Thou hast finished joy ...

Read the full of Fear No More

Sonnet Ci

O truant Muse, what shall be thy amends
For thy neglect of truth in beauty dyed?
Both truth and beauty on my love depends;
So dost thou too, and therein dignified.
Make answer, Muse: wilt thou not haply say
'Truth needs no colour, with his colour fix'd;
Beauty no pencil, beauty's truth to lay;
But best is best, if never intermix'd?'
Because he needs no praise, wilt thou be dumb?