William Shakespeare

(26 April 1564 - 23 April 1616 / Warwickshire)

William Shakespeare Quotes

  • ''O! grief hath changed me since you saw me last,
    And careful hours with time's deformèd hand
    Have written strange defeatures in my face.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Egeon, in The Comedy of Errors, act 5, sc. 1, l. 298-300. Meeting Antipholus and Dromio of Ephesus, who do not recognize him; "defeatures" means disfigurement.
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  • ''A man can no more separate age and covetousness than 'a can
    part young limbs and lechery.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Falstaff, in Henry IV, Part 2, act 1, sc. 2, l. 228-30.
  • ''Full many a glorious morning have I seen
    Flatter the mountain-tops with sovereign eye,
    Kissing with golden face the meadows green,
    Gilding pale streams with heavenly alchemy;''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British poet. Full many a glorious morning have I seen (l. 1-4). . . The Unabridged William Shakespeare, William George Clark and William Aldis Wright, eds. (1989) Running Press.
  • ''Guildenstern. The very substance of the ambitious is merely the shadow of a dream.
    Hamlet. A dream itself is but a shadow.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Guildenstern and Hamlet, in Hamlet, act 2, sc. 2, l. 260-1. Guildenstern thinks Hamlet's problem may be ambition.
  • ''I do not know
    Why yet I live to say, "This thing's to do,"
    Since I have cause, and will, and strength, and means
    To do't.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Hamlet, in Hamlet, act 4, sc. 4, l. 43-6. On his failure to carry out his revenge on Claudius.
  • ''Such was the very armor he had on
    When he the ambitious Norway combated.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Horatio, in Hamlet, act 1, sc. 1, l. 60-1. Speaking of the ghost which has just appeared in the likeness of the dead King of Denmark; "Norway" means King of Norway.
  • ''It makes us, or it mars us, think on that,
    And fix most firm thy resolution.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Iago, in Othello, act 5, sc. 1, l. 4-5. "Makes or mars" was proverbial meaning succeed or be destroyed; to Roderigo, as they ambush Cassio.
  • ''They are but beggars that can count their worth,
    But my true love is grown to such excess
    I cannot sum up sum of half my wealth.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Juliet, in Romeo and Juliet, act 2, sc. 6, l. 32-4. To Romeo as they go off to be married; "sum up sum" means add up the total.
  • ''I and my bosom must debate awhile,
    And then I would no other company.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. King Henry, in Henry V, act 4, sc. 1, l. 31-2. Preparing himself for battle.
  • ''When priests are more in word than matter;
    When brewers mar their malt with water;
    When nobles are their tailors' tutors,
    No heretics burned but wenches' suitors,
    Then shall the realm of Albion
    Come to great confusion.
    When every case in law is right,
    No squire in debt, nor no poor knight;
    When slanders do not live in tongues,
    Nor cutpurses come not to throngs;
    When usurers tell their gold i' the field,
    And bawds and whores do churches build,
    Then comes the time, who lives to see 't,
    That going shall be used with feet.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British poet. King Lear (III, ii). OHFP. The Unabridged William Shakespeare, William George Clark and William Aldis Wright, eds. (1989) Running Press.

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Best Poem of William Shakespeare

All The World's A Stage

All the world's a stage,
And all the men and women merely players;
They have their exits and their entrances,
And one man in his time plays many parts,
His acts being seven ages. At first, the infant,
Mewling and puking in the nurse's arms.
Then the whining schoolboy, with his satchel
And shining morning face, creeping like snail
Unwillingly to school. And then the lover,
Sighing like furnace, with a woeful ballad
Made to his mistress' eyebrow. Then a soldier,
Full of strange oaths and bearded like the pard,
Jealous in honor, sudden and quick in ...

Read the full of All The World's A Stage

Sonnet Lxvi

Tired with all these, for restful death I cry,
As, to behold desert a beggar born,
And needy nothing trimm'd in jollity,
And purest faith unhappily forsworn,
And guilded honour shamefully misplaced,
And maiden virtue rudely strumpeted,
And right perfection wrongfully disgraced,
And strength by limping sway disabled,
And art made tongue-tied by authority,

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