William Shakespeare

(26 April 1564 - 23 April 1616 / Warwickshire)

William Shakespeare Quotes

  • ''Nay, had she been true,
    If heaven would make me such another world
    Of one entire and perfect chrysolite,
    I'd not have sold her for it.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Othello, in Othello, act 5, sc. 2, l. 143-6. Speaking of the now dead Desdemona; "chrysolite" means topaz.
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  • ''One sin, I know, another doth provoke.
    Murder's as near to lust as flame to smoke.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Pericles, in Pericles, act 1, sc. 1, l. 137-8. Fearing for his life now he has revealed the incest of the King and his daughter.
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  • ''He is well paid that is well satisfied.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Portia, in The Merchant of Venice, act 4, sc. 1, l. 415. Disguised as Balthasar the lawyer, she refuses the money offered to her as a fee by her husband Bassanio.
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  • ''Retire me to my Milan, where
    Every third thought shall be my grave.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Prospero, in The Tempest, act 5, sc. 1, l. 311-2. On returning to resume his role as Duke of Milan, and contemplating his death.
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  • ''A milksop, one that never in his life
    Felt so much cold as over shoes in snow.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Richard, in Richard III, act 5, sc. 3, l. 325-6. Trying to raise the spirits of his troops by abusing Richmond.
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  • ''From the east to western Inde,
    No jewel is like Rosalind.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Rosalind, in As You Like It, act 3, sc. 2, l. 88-9. Reading one of Orlando's love poems, with its poor rhyme (Inde means the Indies).
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  • ''Now the devil that told me I did well
    Says that this deed is chronicled in hell.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Sir Pierce of Exton, in Richard II, act 5, sc. 5, l. 115-6. He has just killed Richard II in prison.
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  • ''Such tricks hath strong imagination
    That, if it would but apprehend some joy,
    It comprehends some bringer of that joy;
    Or in the night, imagining some fear,
    How easy is a bush supposed a bear?''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Theseus, in A Midsummer Night's Dream, act 5, sc. 1, l. 21-2. The last line is proverbial (bear may means "bugbear" or hobgoblin).
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  • ''Is it possible
    That love should of a sudden take such hold?''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Tranio, in The Taming of the Shrew, act 1, sc. 1, l. 146-7. His master, Lucentio, has fallen in love at first sight of Bianca.
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  • ''1st Witch. When shall we three meet again?
    In thunder, lightning, or in rain?
    2nd Witch. When the hurly-burly's done,
    When the battle's lost and won.
    3rd Witch. That will be ere set of sun.
    1st Witch. Where the place?
    2nd Witch. Upon the heath.
    3rd Witch. There to meet with Macbeth.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Witches, in Macbeth, act 1, sc. 1, l. 1-7. "Hurly-burly" means tumult of war.
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Best Poem of William Shakespeare

Shall I Compare Thee To A Summer's Day? (Sonnet 18)

Shall I compare thee to a summer's day?
Thou art more lovely and more temperate.
Rough winds do shake the darling buds of May,
And summer's lease hath all too short a date.
Sometime too hot the eye of heaven shines,
And often is his gold complexion dimmed;
And every fair from fair sometime declines,
By chance, or nature's changing course, untrimmed;
But thy eternal summer shall not fade,
Nor lose possession of that fair thou ow'st,
Nor shall death brag thou wand'rest in his shade,
When in eternal lines to Time thou grow'st.
So long as men can breathe, or ...

Read the full of Shall I Compare Thee To A Summer's Day? (Sonnet 18)

Sonnet Cviii

What's in the brain that ink may character
Which hath not figured to thee my true spirit?
What's new to speak, what new to register,
That may express my love or thy dear merit?
Nothing, sweet boy; but yet, like prayers divine,
I must, each day say o'er the very same,
Counting no old thing old, thou mine, I thine,
Even as when first I hallow'd thy fair name.
So that eternal love in love's fresh case