William Shakespeare

(26 April 1564 - 23 April 1616 / Warwickshire)

William Shakespeare Quotes

  • ''But I do think it is their husbands' faults
    If wives do fall.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Emilia, in Othello, act 4, sc. 3, l. 86-7.
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  • ''He saw me, and yielded, that I may justly say, with the
    hook-nosed fellow of Rome, "I came, saw, and overcame."''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Falstaff, in Henry IV, Part 2, act 4, sc. 3, l. 40-2. Ironically comparing himself with Julius Caesar, who is said to have announced a victory with the words "Veni, vidi, vici," I came, I saw, I conquered.
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  • ''These mad mustachio purple-hued maltworms.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Gadshill, in Henry IV, Part 1, act 2, sc. 1, l. 74-5. Beer-drinkers whose mustaches are stained with drink.
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  • ''The friends thou hast, and their adoption tried,
    Grapple them to thy soul with hoops of steel;
    But do not dull thy palm with entertainment
    Of each new-hatched, unfledged comrade. Beware
    Of entrance to a quarrel; but being in,
    Bear't that the opposed may beware of thee.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British poet. Hamlet (I, iii). Advice to his son Laertes, departing for France. The Unabridged William Shakespeare, William George Clark and William Aldis Wright, eds. (1989) Running Press.
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  • ''I could be bounded in a nutshell and count myself a king of
    infinite space, were it not that I have bad dreams.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Hamlet, in Hamlet, act 2, sc. 2, l. 254-6. To Rosencrantz and Guildenstern.
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  • ''Before my God, I might not this believe
    Without the sensible and true avouch
    Of mine own eyes.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Horatio, in Hamlet, act 1, sc. 1, l. 56-8. He was skeptical about the ghost until he saw it; "sensible" means perceived by, or relating to, the senses.
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  • ''With as little a web as this will I ensnare as great a fly as Cassio.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Iago, in Othello, act 2, sc. 1, l. 168-9.
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  • ''I would forget it fain,
    But O, it presses to my memory
    Like damnèd guilty deeds to sinners' minds.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Juliet, in Romeo and Juliet, act 3, sc. 2, l. 109-11. She would forget that she heard Romeo was banished; "fain" means gladly.
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  • ''What rein can hold licentious wickedness
    When down the hill he holds his fierce career?''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. King Henry, in Henry V, act 3, sc. 3, l. 22-3. Suggesting a victorious army, like a horse in full gallop ("career") cannot be restrained from rape and pillage.
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  • ''Howl, howl, howl! O, you are men of stones!
    Had I your tongues and eyes, I'd use them so
    That heaven's vault should crack. She's gone forever.
    I know when one is dead and when one lives;
    She's dead as earth.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British poet. King Lear (V, iii). OHFP. The Unabridged William Shakespeare, William George Clark and William Aldis Wright, eds. (1989) Running Press.
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Best Poem of William Shakespeare

Shall I Compare Thee To A Summer's Day? (Sonnet 18)

Shall I compare thee to a summer's day?
Thou art more lovely and more temperate.
Rough winds do shake the darling buds of May,
And summer's lease hath all too short a date.
Sometime too hot the eye of heaven shines,
And often is his gold complexion dimmed;
And every fair from fair sometime declines,
By chance, or nature's changing course, untrimmed;
But thy eternal summer shall not fade,
Nor lose possession of that fair thou ow'st,
Nor shall death brag thou wand'rest in his shade,
When in eternal lines to Time thou grow'st.
So long as men can breathe, or ...

Read the full of Shall I Compare Thee To A Summer's Day? (Sonnet 18)

Sonnet Lxxvii

Thy glass will show thee how thy beauties wear,
Thy dial how thy precious minutes waste;
The vacant leaves thy mind's imprint will bear,
And of this book this learning mayst thou taste.
The wrinkles which thy glass will truly show
Of mouthed graves will give thee memory;
Thou by thy dial's shady stealth mayst know
Time's thievish progress to eternity.
Look, what thy memory can not contain

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