William Shakespeare

(26 April 1564 - 23 April 1616 / Warwickshire)

William Shakespeare Quotes

  • ''In the most high and palmy state of Rome,
    A little ere the mightiest Julius fell,
    The graves stood tenantless and the sheeted dead
    Did squeak and gibber in the Roman streets.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Horatio, in Hamlet, act 1, sc. 1, l. 113-6. The apparition of the dead King Hamlet suggests some impending calamity, like portents before the assassination of Julius Caesar.
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  • ''If thou survive my well-contented day
    When that churl death my bones with dust shall cover,
    And shalt by fortune once more re-survey
    These poor rude lines of thy deceased lover;
    Compare them with the bettering of the time,
    And though they be outstripped by every pen,
    Reserve them for my love, not for their rhyme
    Exceeded by the height of happier men.
    Oh, then vouchsafe me but this loving thought—
    \'Had my friend's Muse grown with this growing age,
    A dearer birth than this his love had brought,
    To march in ranks of better equipage:
    But since he died, and poets better prove,
    Theirs for their style I'll read, his for his love.'''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British poet. If thou survive my well-contented day (l. 1-14). . . The Unabridged William Shakespeare, William George Clark and William Aldis Wright, eds. (1989) Running Press.
  • ''All my fortunes at thy foot I'll lay,
    And follow thee my lord throughout the world.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Juliet, in Romeo and Juliet, act 2, sc. 2, l. 147-8. Offering to marry Romeo.
  • ''A good soft pillow for that good white head
    Were better than a churlish turf of France.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. King Henry, in Henry V, act 4, sc. 1, l. 14-5. Addressing the old soldier Erpingham.
  • ''Have more than thou showest,
    Speak less than thou knowest,
    Lend less than thou owest,
    Ride more than thou goest,
    Learn more than thou trowest,
    Set less than thou throwest;
    Leave thy drink and thy whore,
    And keep in-a-door,
    And thou shalt have more
    Than two tens to a score.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British poet. King Lear (I, iv). OHFP. The Unabridged William Shakespeare, William George Clark and William Aldis Wright, eds. (1989) Running Press.
  • ''Then join you with them like a rib of steel,
    To make strength stronger.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Lady Percy, in Henry IV, Part 2, act 2, sc. 3, l. 54-5.
  • ''Is whispering nothing?
    Is leaning cheek to cheek? Is meeting noses?
    Kissing with inside lip? Stopping the career
    Of laughter with a sigh?—a note infallible
    Of breaking honesty.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Leontes, in The Winter's Tale, act 1, sc. 2, l. 284-8. Evidence to him that his wife's chastity ("honesty") is suspect; "career" means full gallop.
  • ''Pity, like a naked, new-born babe
    Striding the blast, or heaven's cherubins, horsed
    Upon the sightless couriers of the air,
    Shall blow the horrid deed in every eye,
    That tears shall drown the wind.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Macbeth, in Macbeth, act 1, sc. 7, l. 21-5. In Psalm 18:10 (Book of Common Prayer), God "rode upon the cherubins and did fly; he came flying upon the wings of the wind"; "sightless" means invisible.
  • ''His nature is too noble for the world;
    He would not flatter Neptune for his trident,
    Or Jove for's power to thunder.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Menenius, in Coriolanus, act 3, sc. 1, l. 254-6. On Coriolanus, praising him for being inflexible.
  • ''I do not much dislike the matter, but
    The manner of his speech.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Octavius Caesar, in Antony and Cleopatra, act 2, sc. 2.

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Best Poem of William Shakespeare

All The World's A Stage

All the world's a stage,
And all the men and women merely players;
They have their exits and their entrances,
And one man in his time plays many parts,
His acts being seven ages. At first, the infant,
Mewling and puking in the nurse's arms.
Then the whining schoolboy, with his satchel
And shining morning face, creeping like snail
Unwillingly to school. And then the lover,
Sighing like furnace, with a woeful ballad
Made to his mistress' eyebrow. Then a soldier,
Full of strange oaths and bearded like the pard,
Jealous in honor, sudden and quick in ...

Read the full of All The World's A Stage

Sonnet Lxvi

Tired with all these, for restful death I cry,
As, to behold desert a beggar born,
And needy nothing trimm'd in jollity,
And purest faith unhappily forsworn,
And guilded honour shamefully misplaced,
And maiden virtue rudely strumpeted,
And right perfection wrongfully disgraced,
And strength by limping sway disabled,
And art made tongue-tied by authority,

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