William Shakespeare

(26 April 1564 - 23 April 1616 / Warwickshire)

William Shakespeare Quotes

  • ''I will play the swan,
    And die in music.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Emilia, in Othello, act 5, sc. 2, l. 247-8. Proverbially the swan sang before it died (hence "swansong").
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  • ''I have speeded hither with the very extremest inch of
    possibility.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Falstaff, in Henry IV, Part 2, act 4, sc. 3, l. 34-5. Excusing himself for being late.
  • ''Superfluous branches
    We lop away, that bearing boughs may live.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Gardener, in Richard II, act 3, sc. 4, l. 63-4.
  • ''To be, or not to be: that is the question:
    Whether 'tis nobler in the mind to suffer
    The slings and arrows of outrageous fortune,
    Or to take arms against a sea of troubles,
    And by opposing end them? To die: to sleep;
    No more; and by a sleep to say we end
    The heart-ache and the thousand natural shocks
    That flesh is heir to, 'tis a consummation
    Devoutly to be wished. To die, to sleep;
    To sleep; perchance to dream: ay, there's the rub;
    For in that sleep of death what dreams may come
    When we have shuffled off this mortal coil,
    Must give us pause: there's the respect
    That makes calamity of so long life;''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British poet. Hamlet (V, i.). NAWM-1. The Unabridged William Shakespeare, William George Clark and William Aldis Wright, eds. (1989) Running Press.
  • ''If thou didst ever hold me in thy heart,
    Absent thee from felicity awhile,
    And in this harsh world draw thy breath in pain
    To tell my story.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Hamlet, in Hamlet, act 5, sc. 2, l. 346-9. As he lies dying, he prevents Horatio from committing suicide; Hamlet pleads with him to live on to tell the world the truth.
  • ''But look, the morn in russet mantle clad
    Walks o'er the dew of yon high eastward hill.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Horatio, in Hamlet, act 1, sc. 1, l. 166-7.
  • ''There cannot be a pinch in death
    More sharp than this is.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Imogen, in Cymbeline, act 1, sc. 1, l. 130-1. On the banishment of Posthumus, her husband.
  • ''Wilt thou be gone? it is not yet near day.
    It was the nightingale, and not the lark,
    That pierced the fearful hollow of thine ear;
    Nightly she sings on yond pomegranate tree.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Juliet, in Romeo and Juliet, act 3, sc. 5, l. 1-4. To Romeo, who is anxious to get away at daybreak; "fearful" means anxious.
  • ''Now sits the wind fair, and we will aboard.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. King Henry, in Henry V, act 2, sc. 2, l. 12. Preparing to sail for France.
  • ''My life I never held but as a pawn
    To wage against thine enemies' nor fear to lose it,
    Thy safety being motive.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British poet. King Lear (I, i). OHFP. The Unabridged William Shakespeare, William George Clark and William Aldis Wright, eds. (1989) Running Press.

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Best Poem of William Shakespeare

All The World's A Stage

All the world's a stage,
And all the men and women merely players;
They have their exits and their entrances,
And one man in his time plays many parts,
His acts being seven ages. At first, the infant,
Mewling and puking in the nurse's arms.
Then the whining schoolboy, with his satchel
And shining morning face, creeping like snail
Unwillingly to school. And then the lover,
Sighing like furnace, with a woeful ballad
Made to his mistress' eyebrow. Then a soldier,
Full of strange oaths and bearded like the pard,
Jealous in honor, sudden and quick in ...

Read the full of All The World's A Stage

Sonnet Ci

O truant Muse, what shall be thy amends
For thy neglect of truth in beauty dyed?
Both truth and beauty on my love depends;
So dost thou too, and therein dignified.
Make answer, Muse: wilt thou not haply say
'Truth needs no colour, with his colour fix'd;
Beauty no pencil, beauty's truth to lay;
But best is best, if never intermix'd?'
Because he needs no praise, wilt thou be dumb?

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