William Shakespeare

(26 April 1564 - 23 April 1616 / Warwickshire)

William Shakespeare Quotes

  • ''Weigh what loss your honor may sustain
    If with too credent ear you list his songs,
    Or lose your heart, or your chaste treasure open
    To his unmastered importunity.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Laertes, in Hamlet, act 1, sc. 3, l. 29-32. Speaking to Ophelia of Hamlet's professions of love to her; "credent" means credulous; "chaste treasure" means virginity.
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  • ''Thou dost advise me
    Even so as I mine own course have set down.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Leontes, in The Winter's Tale, act 1, sc. 2, l. 339-40. On hearing Camillo's advice to treat Hermione well.
  • ''Light thickens, and the crow
    Makes wing to th' rooky wood.
    Good things of day begin to droop and drowse,
    Whiles night's black agents to their preys do rouse.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Macbeth, in Macbeth, act 3, sc. 2, l. 50-3. Invoking the powers of darkness before murdering Banquo.
  • ''One that converses more with the buttock of the night than
    with the forehead of the morning.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Menenius, in Coriolanus, act 2, sc. 1, l. 51-3. Portraying himself as to carouse at night rather than rise early.
  • ''According to his virtue let us use him,
    With all respect and rites of burial.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Octavius, in Julius Caesar, act 5, sc. 5, l. 76-7. On the death of Brutus.
  • ''Who can control his fate?''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Othello, in Othello, act 5, sc. 2, l. 265.
  • ''The sad companion, dull-eyed melancholy.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Pericles, in Pericles, act 1, sc. 2, l. 2.
  • ''Your wife would give you little thanks for that
    If she were by to hear you make the offer.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Portia, in The Merchant of Venice, act 4, sc. 1, l. 288-9. Disguised as a lawyer, she hears Bassanio value Antonio's life above everything, including herself.
  • ''But he's something stained
    With grief, that's beauty's canker, thou mightst call him
    A goodly person.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Prospero, in The Tempest, act 1, sc. 2, l. 415-7. Describing Ferdinand; the cankerworm feeds on buds.
  • ''I shall despair. There is no creature loves me,
    And if I die no soul will pity me.
    And wherefore should they, since that I myself
    Find in myself no pity to myself?''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Richard, in Richard III, act 5, sc. 3, l. 200-3. Realizing that he has cut himself off from everyone.

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Best Poem of William Shakespeare

All The World's A Stage

All the world's a stage,
And all the men and women merely players;
They have their exits and their entrances,
And one man in his time plays many parts,
His acts being seven ages. At first, the infant,
Mewling and puking in the nurse's arms.
Then the whining schoolboy, with his satchel
And shining morning face, creeping like snail
Unwillingly to school. And then the lover,
Sighing like furnace, with a woeful ballad
Made to his mistress' eyebrow. Then a soldier,
Full of strange oaths and bearded like the pard,
Jealous in honor, sudden and quick in ...

Read the full of All The World's A Stage

Sonnet Cviii

What's in the brain that ink may character
Which hath not figured to thee my true spirit?
What's new to speak, what new to register,
That may express my love or thy dear merit?
Nothing, sweet boy; but yet, like prayers divine,
I must, each day say o'er the very same,
Counting no old thing old, thou mine, I thine,
Even as when first I hallow'd thy fair name.
So that eternal love in love's fresh case

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