William Shakespeare

(26 April 1564 - 23 April 1616 / Warwickshire)

William Shakespeare Quotes

  • ''Be bloody, bold, and resolute; laugh to scorn
    The power of man; for none of woman born
    Shall harm Macbeth.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. 2nd Apparition, in Macbeth, act 4, sc. 1, l. 79-81.
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  • ''Dreams are toys.
    Yet for this once, yea, superstitiously,
    I will be squared by this.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Antigonus, in The Winter's Tale, act 3, sc. 3, l. 39-41. Dreams are trifles ("toys"), yet Antigonus allows himself to be directed ("squared") in his course of action by his dream of Hermione.
  • ''If you have tears, prepare to shed them now.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Antony, in Julius Caesar, act 3, sc. 2, l. 169. Displaying the body of Caesar to the people.
  • ''It is my cousin's duty to make curtsy and say, "Father, as it please you." But yet for all that, cousin, let him be a handsome fellow, or else make another curtsy and say, "Father, as it please me."''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Beatrice, in Much Ado About Nothing, act 2, sc. 1, l. 52-6.
  • ''There we may rehearse most obscenely and courageously.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Bottom, in A Midsummer Night's Dream, act 1, sc. 2, l. 107-8. "Obscenely" is Bottom's mistake for "seemly" (fitly).
  • ''That high All-seer which I dallied with
    Hath turned my feigned prayer on my head,
    And given in earnest what I begged in jest.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Buckingham, in Richard III, act 4, sc. 5, l. 20-2. Buckingham had called on God to punish him if he was ever false to King Edward, and now goes to his death, executed by Richard.
  • ''Cassius. Will you dine with me tomorrow?
    Casca. Ay, if I be alive, and your mind hold, and your dinner be worth the eating.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Cassius and Casca, in Julius Caesar, act 1, sc. 2, l. 290-2.
  • ''What, courage, man! What though care killed a cat, thou hast mettle enough in thee to kill care.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Claudio, in Much Ado About Nothing, act 5, sc. 1, l. 132-4. To Benedick, who is unusually serious and full of care; "care will kill a cat" is proverbial.
  • ''I wish you all joy of the worm.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Clown, in Antony and Cleopatra, act 5, sc. 2, l. 260. His parting words to Cleopatra as he leaves her the asps or snakes she uses to kill herself.
  • ''Comparisons are odorous.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Dogberry, in Much Ado About Nothing, act 3, sc. 5, l. 16. Meaning "odious," and getting the proverb amusingly wrong.

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Best Poem of William Shakespeare

All The World's A Stage

All the world's a stage,
And all the men and women merely players;
They have their exits and their entrances,
And one man in his time plays many parts,
His acts being seven ages. At first, the infant,
Mewling and puking in the nurse's arms.
Then the whining schoolboy, with his satchel
And shining morning face, creeping like snail
Unwillingly to school. And then the lover,
Sighing like furnace, with a woeful ballad
Made to his mistress' eyebrow. Then a soldier,
Full of strange oaths and bearded like the pard,
Jealous in honor, sudden and quick in ...

Read the full of All The World's A Stage

Sonnet Ci

O truant Muse, what shall be thy amends
For thy neglect of truth in beauty dyed?
Both truth and beauty on my love depends;
So dost thou too, and therein dignified.
Make answer, Muse: wilt thou not haply say
'Truth needs no colour, with his colour fix'd;
Beauty no pencil, beauty's truth to lay;
But best is best, if never intermix'd?'
Because he needs no praise, wilt thou be dumb?

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