William Shakespeare

(26 April 1564 - 23 April 1616 / Warwickshire)

William Shakespeare Quotes

  • ''I am more an antique Roman than a Dane.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Horatio, in Hamlet, act 5, sc. 2, l. 341. Meaning he chooses the Stoic path of suicide, recommended by Seneca, rather than the modern Christian one of survival.
    0 person liked.
    0 person did not like.
  • ''Against self-slaughter
    There is a prohibition so divine
    That cravens my weak hand.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Imogen, in Cymbeline, act 3, sc. 4, l. 76-8. Alluding to the Christian injunction against suicide.
    0 person liked.
    0 person did not like.
  • ''My bounty is as boundless as the sea,
    My love as deep. The more I give to thee
    The more I have, for both are infinite.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Juliet, in Romeo and Juliet, act 2, sc. 2, l. 133-5. Expressing her devotion to Romeo.
    1 person liked.
    0 person did not like.
  • ''We are but warriors for the working day.
    Our gayness and our gilt are all besmirched
    With rainy marching in the painful field.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. King Henry, in Henry V, act 4, sc. 3, l. 109-11. On the bedraggled English army.
    0 person liked.
    0 person did not like.
  • ''Fathers that wear rags
    Do make their children blind,
    But fathers that bear bags
    Shall see their children kind.
    Fortune, that arrant whore,
    Ne'er turns the key to the poor.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British poet. King Lear (II, iv). OHFP. The Unabridged William Shakespeare, William George Clark and William Aldis Wright, eds. (1989) Running Press.
    0 person liked.
    0 person did not like.
  • ''Lay her i'th'earth,
    And from her fair and unpolluted flesh
    May violets spring.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Laertes, in Hamlet, act 5, sc. 1, l. 238-40. Burial of Ophelia.
    0 person liked.
    0 person did not like.
  • ''Nor night, nor day, no rest.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Leontes, in The Winter's Tale, act 2, sc. 3, l. 1.
    0 person liked.
    0 person did not like.
  • ''Canst thou not minister to a mind diseased,
    Pluck from the memory a rooted sorrow,
    Raze out the written troubles of the brain,
    And with some sweet oblivious antidote
    Cleanse the fraught bosom of that perilous stuff
    Which weighs upon the heart?''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Macbeth, in Macbeth, act 5, sc. 3, l. 42-7 (1623). Speaking to the Doctor of Physic.
    0 person liked.
    0 person did not like.
  • ''Thy head is as full of quarrels as an egg is full of meat.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Mercutio, in Romeo and Juliet, act 3, sc. 1, l. 22-3. The "meat" of the egg is what can be eaten.
    0 person liked.
    0 person did not like.
  • ''Thou seest I have more flesh than another man, and therefore more frailty.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Oldcastle (Falstaff), in Henry IV pt. 1, act 3, sc. 3, l. 167-9 (1598).
    3 person liked.
    1 person did not like.

Read more quotations »
Best Poem of William Shakespeare

A Fairy Song

Over hill, over dale,
Thorough bush, thorough brier,
Over park, over pale,
Thorough flood, thorough fire!
I do wander everywhere,
Swifter than the moon's sphere;
And I serve the Fairy Queen,
To dew her orbs upon the green;
The cowslips tall her pensioners be;
In their gold coats spots you see;
Those be rubies, fairy favours;
In those freckles live their savours;
I must go seek some dewdrops here,
And hang a pearl in every cowslip's ear.

Read the full of A Fairy Song

Sonnet Cviii

What's in the brain that ink may character
Which hath not figured to thee my true spirit?
What's new to speak, what new to register,
That may express my love or thy dear merit?
Nothing, sweet boy; but yet, like prayers divine,
I must, each day say o'er the very same,
Counting no old thing old, thou mine, I thine,
Even as when first I hallow'd thy fair name.
So that eternal love in love's fresh case

[Report Error]