William Shakespeare

(26 April 1564 - 23 April 1616 / Warwickshire)

William Shakespeare Quotes

  • ''My decayèd fair
    A sunny look of his would soon repair.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Adriana, in The Comedy of Errors, act 2, sc. 1, l. 98-9. Complaining about her absent husband.
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  • ''I am sure,
    Though you can guess what temperance should be,
    You know not what it is.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Antony, in Antony and Cleopatra, act 3, sc. 13, l. 120-2. Criticizing Cleopatra.
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  • ''Blow, blow, thou winter wind!
    Thou art not so unkind
    As man's ingratitude;
    Thy tooth is not so keen
    Because thou art not seen,
    Although thy breath be rude.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British poet. As You Like It (II, vii). Sung by a follower of the banished rightful Duke Senior. The Unabridged William Shakespeare, William George Clark and William Aldis Wright, eds. (1989) Running Press.
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  • ''Your answer, sir, is enigmatical.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Benedick, in Much Ado About Nothing, act 5, sc. 4, l. 27. He is puzzled by Leonato's reference to the trick played on him to make him fall in love with Beatrice.
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  • ''Good gentlemen, look fresh and merrily.
    Let not our looks put on our purposes,
    But bear it as our Roman actors do,
    With untired spirits and formal constancy.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Brutus, in Julius Caesar, act 2, sc. 1, l. 224-7. As the conspirators set off toward the Capitol.
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  • ''He is a lion
    That I am proud to hunt.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Caius Marcius, later Coriolanus, in Coriolanus, act 1, sc. 1, l. 235-6. A warrior's admiration for his rival, Tullus Aufidius, leader of the Volsces.
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  • ''I cannot live out of her company.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Celia, in As You Like It, act 1, sc. 3, l. 86. Referring to herself and her cousin Rosalind.
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  • ''There's such divinity doth hedge a king
    That treason can but peep to what it would,
    Acts little of his will.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Claudius, in Hamlet, act 4, sc. 5, l. 124-6. James I liked to claim that kings were gods on earth. It is ironic that Claudius, who murdered King Hamlet, should claim divine protection; "his" means its.
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  • ''Chaste as the icicle
    That's curdied by the frost from purest snow
    And hangs on Dian's temple.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Coriolanus, in Coriolanus, act 5, sc. 3, l. 65-7. On Valeria, friend of his wife, Virgilia; "curdied" means congealed; Diana was goddess of the moon and of chastity.
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  • ''My love is thine to teach; teach it but how,
    And thou shalt see how apt it is to learn
    Any hard lesson that may do thee good.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Don Pedro, in Much Ado About Nothing, act 1, sc. 1, l. 291-3. Offering to help Claudio in any way to woo Hero.
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Best Poem of William Shakespeare

Fear No More

Fear no more the heat o' the sun;
Nor the furious winter's rages,
Thou thy worldly task hast done,
Home art gone, and ta'en thy wages;
Golden lads and girls all must,
As chimney sweepers come to dust.

Fear no more the frown of the great,
Thou art past the tyrant's stroke:
Care no more to clothe and eat;
To thee the reed is as the oak:
The sceptre, learning, physic, must
All follow this, and come to dust.

Fear no more the lightning-flash,
Nor the all-dread thunder-stone;
Fear not slander, censure rash;
Thou hast finished joy ...

Read the full of Fear No More

Sonnet Lxxvii

Thy glass will show thee how thy beauties wear,
Thy dial how thy precious minutes waste;
The vacant leaves thy mind's imprint will bear,
And of this book this learning mayst thou taste.
The wrinkles which thy glass will truly show
Of mouthed graves will give thee memory;
Thou by thy dial's shady stealth mayst know
Time's thievish progress to eternity.
Look, what thy memory can not contain

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