William Shakespeare

(26 April 1564 - 23 April 1616 / Warwickshire)

William Shakespeare Quotes

  • ''But jealous souls will not be answered so;
    They are not ever jealous for the cause,
    But jealous for they're jealous. It is a monster
    Begot upon itself, born on itself.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Emilia, in Othello, act 3, sc. 4, l. 159-62.
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  • ''O, you shall see him laugh till his face be like a wet cloak
    ill laid up.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Falstaff, in Henry IV, Part 2, act 5, sc. 1, l. 84-5.
  • ''Gertrude. Why seems it so particular with thee?
    Hamlet. Seems, madam? nay, it is, I know not "seems."''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Gertrude and Hamlet, in Hamlet, act 1, sc. 2, l. 75-6. Gertrude has attempted to console Hamlet for his father's death by urging that death is common, i.e., universal, not "particular."
  • ''"The rugged Pyrrhus, he whose sable arms,
    Black as his purpose, did the night resemble
    When he lay couched in the ominous horse,
    Hath now this dread and black complexion smeared
    With heraldry more dismal. Head to foot
    Now is he total gules, horridly tricked
    With blood of fathers, mothers, daughters, sons,
    Baked and impasted with the parching streets,
    That lend a tyrannous and a damned light
    To their lord's murder. Roasted in wrath and fire,
    And thus o'ersized with coagulate gore,
    With eyes like carbuncles, the hellish Pyrrhus
    Old grandsire Priam seeks."''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British poet. Hamlet (II, ii). NAWM-1. The Unabridged William Shakespeare, William George Clark and William Aldis Wright, eds. (1989) Running Press.
  • '''Tis a consummation
    Devoutly to be wished.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Hamlet, in Hamlet, act 3, sc. 1, l. 62-3. "Consummation" means final completion of this life.
  • ''What art thou that usurp'st this time of night,
    Together with that fair and warlike form
    In which the majesty of buried Denmark
    Did sometimes march? By heaven I charge thee speak!''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Horatio, in Hamlet, act 1, sc. 1, l. 46-9. Addressing the ghost of Hamlet's father, the dead King of Denmark; Horatio questions the ghost's right to assume that likeness, and its right to invade the night, by the use of the term "usurp'st."
  • ''Look,
    I draw the sword myself; take it, and hit
    The innocent mansion of my love, my heart.
    Fear not, 'tis empty of all things but grief.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Imogen, in Cymbeline, act 3, sc. 4, l. 66-9. She draws Pisanio's sword, on learning he has been ordered by Posthumus to murder her.
  • ''But old folks—many feign as they were dead,
    Unwieldy, slow, heavy, and pale as lead.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Juliet, in Romeo and Juliet, act 2, sc. 5, l. 16-7. Thinking of her old nurse; "feign as" means behave as if.
  • ''He that shall see this day and live old age
    Will yearly on the vigil feast his neighbors
    And say, "Tomorrow is Saint Crispian."''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. King Henry, in Henry V, act 4, sc. 3, l. 44-6. October 25, the day the battle of Agincourt was fought.
  • ''Good my lord,
    You have begot me, bred me, loved me. I
    Return those duties back as are right fit,
    Obey you, love you, and most honor you.
    Why have my sisters husbands if they say
    They love you all? Haply, when I shall wed,
    That lord whose hand must take my plight shall carry
    Half my love with him, half my care and duty.
    Sure I shall never marry like my sisters,
    To love my father all.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British poet. King Lear (I, i). OHFP. The Unabridged William Shakespeare, William George Clark and William Aldis Wright, eds. (1989) Running Press.

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Best Poem of William Shakespeare

All The World's A Stage

All the world's a stage,
And all the men and women merely players;
They have their exits and their entrances,
And one man in his time plays many parts,
His acts being seven ages. At first, the infant,
Mewling and puking in the nurse's arms.
Then the whining schoolboy, with his satchel
And shining morning face, creeping like snail
Unwillingly to school. And then the lover,
Sighing like furnace, with a woeful ballad
Made to his mistress' eyebrow. Then a soldier,
Full of strange oaths and bearded like the pard,
Jealous in honor, sudden and quick in ...

Read the full of All The World's A Stage

Sonnet Ci

O truant Muse, what shall be thy amends
For thy neglect of truth in beauty dyed?
Both truth and beauty on my love depends;
So dost thou too, and therein dignified.
Make answer, Muse: wilt thou not haply say
'Truth needs no colour, with his colour fix'd;
Beauty no pencil, beauty's truth to lay;
But best is best, if never intermix'd?'
Because he needs no praise, wilt thou be dumb?

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