William Shakespeare

(26 April 1564 - 23 April 1616 / Warwickshire)

William Shakespeare Quotes

  • ''A violet in the youth of primy nature,
    Forward, not permanent, sweet, not lasting.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Laertes, in Hamlet, act 1, sc. 3, l. 8. Describing Hamlet's love as expressed to Ophelia; "primy" means in its prime, in the spring.
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  • ''A hovering temporizer, that
    Canst with thine eyes at once see good and evil,
    Inclining to them both.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Leontes, in The Winter's Tale, act 1, sc. 2, l. 302-4. His misguided perception of his counsellor, Camillo.
  • ''Will all great Neptune's ocean wash this blood
    Clean from my hand? No. This my hand will rather
    The multitudinous seas incarnadine,
    Making the green one red.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Macbeth, in Macbeth, act 2, sc. 2, l. 57-60. "Incarnadine" means turn red.
  • ''I am the very pink of courtesy.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Mercutio, in Romeo and Juliet, act 2, sc. 4, l. 57. "Pink" means embodiment or perfection.
  • ''Lord worshipped might he be, what a beard hast thou got!''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Old Gobbo, in The Merchant of Venice, act 2, sc. 2, l. 93-4. The blind old man mistakes his son's long hair for a beard.
  • ''Were it my cue to fight, I should have known it
    Without a prompter.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Othello, in Othello, act 1, sc. 2, l. 83-4. Speaking as a soldier.
  • ''Better once than never, for never too late.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Petruchio, in The Taming of the Shrew, act 5, sc. 1, l. 150. To Katherine on her agreeing to kiss him in the street; proverbial: "better late than never" and "it is never too late to mend."
  • ''It is a good divine that follows his own instructions; I can easier teach twenty what were good to be done, than to be one of the twenty to follow mine own teaching.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Portia, in The Merchant of Venice, act 1, sc. 2, l. 14-7. Echoing the proverb "practice what you preach."
  • ''Then to the elements
    Be free, and fare thou well!''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Prospero, in The Tempest, act 5, sc. 1, l. 318-9. His final parting with his devoted spirit, Ariel.
  • ''Look how my ring encompasseth thy finger;
    Even so thy breast encloseth my poor heart.
    Wear both of them, for both of them are thine.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Richard, in Richard III, act 1, sc. 2, l. 203-5. Lady Anne succumbs to his wily courtship by accepting the ring he gives her.

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Best Poem of William Shakespeare

All The World's A Stage

All the world's a stage,
And all the men and women merely players;
They have their exits and their entrances,
And one man in his time plays many parts,
His acts being seven ages. At first, the infant,
Mewling and puking in the nurse's arms.
Then the whining schoolboy, with his satchel
And shining morning face, creeping like snail
Unwillingly to school. And then the lover,
Sighing like furnace, with a woeful ballad
Made to his mistress' eyebrow. Then a soldier,
Full of strange oaths and bearded like the pard,
Jealous in honor, sudden and quick in ...

Read the full of All The World's A Stage

Sonnet Li

Thus can my love excuse the slow offence
Of my dull bearer when from thee I speed:
From where thou art why should I haste me thence?
Till I return, of posting is no need.
O, what excuse will my poor beast then find,
When swift extremity can seem but slow?
Then should I spur, though mounted on the wind;
In winged speed no motion shall I know:
Then can no horse with my desire keep pace;

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