William Shakespeare

(26 April 1564 - 23 April 1616 / Warwickshire)

William Shakespeare Quotes

  • ''What's the matter, you dissentious rogues,
    That rubbing the poor itch of your opinion
    Make yourselves scabs?''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Caius Marcius, later Coriolanus, in Coriolanus, act 1, sc. 1, l. 164-6. A patrician reveals his contempt for the people and their opinions.
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  • ''West of this place, down in the neighbor bottom,
    The rank of osiers by the murmuring stream
    Left on your right hand brings you to the place.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Celia, in As You Like It, act 4, sc. 3, l. 78-80. Directions to Oliver to the house Celia and Rosalind live in; left means passed by.
  • ''Who makes the fairest show means most deceit.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Cleon, in Pericles, act 1, sc. 4, l. 75. Misinterpreting the arrival of the fleet of Pericles that is bringing aid to Tarsus; proverbial.
  • ''He cannot flatter, he,
    An honest mind and plain, he must speak truth!
    And they will take it, so; if not, he's plain.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Cornwall, in King Lear, act 2, sc. 2, l. 98-100. Speaking about the disguised Kent.
  • ''It is the witness still of excellency
    To put a strange face on his own perfection.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Don Pedro, in Much Ado About Nothing, act 2, sc. 3, l. 46-7. On the singer Balthasar; it is typical of the truly talented not to seem to be aware of their own high skill.
  • ''When valour preys on reason,
    It eats the sword it fights with.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Enobarbus, in Antony and Cleopatra, act 3, sc. 13.
  • ''The devil take one party and his dam the other!''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Falstaff, in The Merry Wives of Windsor, act 4, sc. 5, l. 106-7. On being tricked by Mrs. Ford and Mrs. Page; "dam" = dame or woman.
  • ''Thou turn'st my eyes into my very soul,
    And there I see such black and grained spots
    As will not leave their tinct.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Gertrude, in Hamlet, act 3, sc. 4, l. 89-91. Hamlet has made her conscious of her guilt in marrying Claudius; "grained" means ingrained, fast-dyed.
  • ''Seems, madam? Nay, it is. I know not "seems".
    'Tis not alone my inky cloak, good Mother,
    Nor customary suits of solemn black,
    Nor windy suspiration of forced breath,
    No, nor the fruitful river in the eye,
    Nor the dejected havior of the visage,
    Together with all forms, moods, shapes of grief,
    That can denote me truly. These indeed seem,
    For they are actions that a man might play.
    But I have that within which passes show;
    These but the trappings and the suits of woe.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British poet. Hamlet (I, ii). NAWM-1. The Unabridged William Shakespeare, William George Clark and William Aldis Wright, eds. (1989) Running Press.
  • '''Tis not alone my inky cloak, good mother,
    Nor customary suits of solemn black,
    ...
    Together with all forms, moods, shapes of grief,
    That can denote me truly.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Hamlet, in Hamlet, act 1, sc. 2, l. 77-8, 82-3. Outward shows of mourning do not do justice to his inward grief for his father's death.

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Best Poem of William Shakespeare

All The World's A Stage

All the world's a stage,
And all the men and women merely players;
They have their exits and their entrances,
And one man in his time plays many parts,
His acts being seven ages. At first, the infant,
Mewling and puking in the nurse's arms.
Then the whining schoolboy, with his satchel
And shining morning face, creeping like snail
Unwillingly to school. And then the lover,
Sighing like furnace, with a woeful ballad
Made to his mistress' eyebrow. Then a soldier,
Full of strange oaths and bearded like the pard,
Jealous in honor, sudden and quick in ...

Read the full of All The World's A Stage

Sonnet Li

Thus can my love excuse the slow offence
Of my dull bearer when from thee I speed:
From where thou art why should I haste me thence?
Till I return, of posting is no need.
O, what excuse will my poor beast then find,
When swift extremity can seem but slow?
Then should I spur, though mounted on the wind;
In winged speed no motion shall I know:
Then can no horse with my desire keep pace;

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