William Shakespeare

(26 April 1564 - 23 April 1616 / Warwickshire)

William Shakespeare Quotes

  • ''Hortensio. Madam, my instrument's in tune.
    Bianca. Let's hear. O fie, the treble jars.
    Lucentio. Spit in the hole, man, and tune again.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Hortensio, Bianca, and Lucentio, in The Taming of the Shrew, act 3, sc. 1, l. 38-40. Hortensio's lute was a difficult instrument to tune, and Lucentio may be advising him to moisten the pegs.
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  • ''O, for a horse with wings!''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Imogen, in Cymbeline, act 3, sc. 2, l. 48. Imogen learns that her husband Posthumus is at Milford-Haven.
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  • ''Love's heralds should be thoughts,
    Which ten times faster glides than the sun's beams,
    Driving back shadows over low'ring hills.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Juliet, in Romeo and Juliet, act 2, sc. 5, l. 4-6. Anxiously expecting her nurse to return with news of Romeo.
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  • ''I have no cunning in protestation—only downright oaths, which I never use till urged, nor never break for urging.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. King Henry, in Henry V, act 5, sc. 2, l. 144-6. Plain speaking in making love to Katherine.
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  • ''Love that comes too late,
    Like a remorseful pardon slowly carried,
    To the great sender turns a sour offense,
    Crying, "That's good that's gone."''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. King of France, in All's Well That Ends Well, act 5, sc. 3, l. 57-60. Expressing the familiar feeling of realizing that we value a thing only when it is lost.
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  • ''As a woodcock to mine own springe, Osric:
    I am justly killed with mine own treachery.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Laertes, in Hamlet, act 5, sc. 2, l. 306-7. He is wounded by the poisoned rapier he intended for Hamlet; "springe" means snare.
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  • ''There have been,
    Or I am much deceived, cuckolds ere now,
    And many a man there is, even at this present,
    Now, while I speak this, holds his wife by th'arm,
    That little thinks she has been sluiced in's absence,
    And his pond fished by his next neighbor, by
    Sir Smile, his neighbor.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Leontes, in The Winter's Tale, act 1, sc. 2, l. 190-6. Beginning to believe the worst of his own wife.
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  • '''Tis much he dares,
    And to that dauntless temper of his mind,
    He hath a wisdom that doth guide his valor
    To act in safety.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Macbeth, in Macbeth, act 3, sc. 1, l. 50-3. Describing Banquo.
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  • ''Thou wilt quarrel with a man for cracking nuts, having no other reason but because thou hast hazel eyes.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Mercutio, in Romeo and Juliet, act 3, sc. 1, l. 18-20. Mocking his friend Benvolio.
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  • ''God's benison go with you, and with those
    That would make good of bad, and friends of foes!''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Old Man, in Macbeth, act 2, sc. 4, l. 40-1. "Benison" means blessing.
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Best Poem of William Shakespeare

Shall I Compare Thee To A Summer's Day? (Sonnet 18)

Shall I compare thee to a summer's day?
Thou art more lovely and more temperate.
Rough winds do shake the darling buds of May,
And summer's lease hath all too short a date.
Sometime too hot the eye of heaven shines,
And often is his gold complexion dimmed;
And every fair from fair sometime declines,
By chance, or nature's changing course, untrimmed;
But thy eternal summer shall not fade,
Nor lose possession of that fair thou ow'st,
Nor shall death brag thou wand'rest in his shade,
When in eternal lines to Time thou grow'st.
So long as men can breathe, or ...

Read the full of Shall I Compare Thee To A Summer's Day? (Sonnet 18)

Sonnet Cviii

What's in the brain that ink may character
Which hath not figured to thee my true spirit?
What's new to speak, what new to register,
That may express my love or thy dear merit?
Nothing, sweet boy; but yet, like prayers divine,
I must, each day say o'er the very same,
Counting no old thing old, thou mine, I thine,
Even as when first I hallow'd thy fair name.
So that eternal love in love's fresh case

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