William Shakespeare

(26 April 1564 - 23 April 1616 / Warwickshire)

William Shakespeare Quotes

  • ''O ill-starred wench,
    Pale as thy smock! When we shall meet at compt,
    This look of thine will hurl my soul from heaven,
    And fiends will snatch at it. Cold, cold, my girl,
    Even like thy chastity.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Othello, in Othello, act 5, sc. 2, l. 272-6. Looking at Desdemona's lifeless body; "compt" means the day of judgment.
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  • ''We will have rings and things, and fine array,
    And kiss me, Kate, we will be married o' Sunday.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Petruchio, in The Taming of the Shrew, act 2, sc. 1, l. 323-4. "Kiss me, Kate" is the title of a musical based on the play; "we will be married o' Sunday" occurs as a refrain in ballads.
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  • ''As thou urgest justice, be assured
    Thou shalt have justice more than thou desirest.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Portia, in The Merchant of Venice, act 4, sc. 1, l. 315-6. The law says that Shylock must not shed the blood of a Christian.
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  • ''Now my charms are all o'erthrown,
    And what strength I have's mine own,
    Which is most faint.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Prospero, in The Tempest, epilogue, l. 1-3. Appealing to the audience in his epilogue.
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  • ''The King's name is a tower of strength.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Richard, in Richard III, act 5, sc. 3, l. 12. Relying on his reputation in fighting against Richmond.
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  • ''O coz, coz, coz, my pretty little coz, that thou didst know
    how many fathom deep I am in love!''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Rosalind, in As You Like It, act 4, sc. 1, l. 205-7. Addressing Celia.
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  • ''I will meditate the while upon some horrid message for a challenge.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Sir Toby Belch, in Twelfth Night, act 3, sc. 4, l. 199-200. In place of Sir Andrew's silly written challenge to Cesario.
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  • ''Come now, what masques, what dances shall we have
    To wear away this long age of three hours
    Between our after-supper and bedtime?''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Theseus, in A Midsummer Night's Dream, act 5, sc. 1, l. 32-4. "Masques" were courtly entertainments based on the idea of masked dancers.
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  • ''Troilus. You have bereft me of all words, lady.
    Pandarus. Words pay no debts, give her deeds.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Troilus, and Pandarus in Troilus and Cressida, act 3, sc. 2, l. 54-5. Troilus is overwhelmed by his first encounter with Cressida.
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  • ''Being fed by us you used us so
    As that ungentle gull, the cuckoo's bird,
    Useth the sparrow.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Worcester, in Henry IV, Part 1, act 5, sc. 1, l. 59-61. The cuckoo lays its eggs in nests of other birds, such as the sparrow, which feeds the cuckoo's young at the expense of its own chicks.
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Best Poem of William Shakespeare

O Mistress Mine, Where Are You Roaming? (Twelfth Night, Act Ii, Scene Iii)

O mistress mine, where are you roaming?
O stay and hear! your true-love's coming
That can sing both high and low;
Trip no further, pretty sweeting,
Journey's end in lovers' meeting-
Every wise man's son doth know.

What is love? 'tis not hereafter;
Present mirth hath present laughter;
What's to come is still unsure:
In delay there lies no plenty,-
Then come kiss me, Sweet and twenty,
Youth's a stuff will not endure.

Read the full of O Mistress Mine, Where Are You Roaming? (Twelfth Night, Act Ii, Scene Iii)

Sonnet Ci

O truant Muse, what shall be thy amends
For thy neglect of truth in beauty dyed?
Both truth and beauty on my love depends;
So dost thou too, and therein dignified.
Make answer, Muse: wilt thou not haply say
'Truth needs no colour, with his colour fix'd;
Beauty no pencil, beauty's truth to lay;
But best is best, if never intermix'd?'
Because he needs no praise, wilt thou be dumb?

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