William Shakespeare

(26 April 1564 - 23 April 1616 / Warwickshire)

William Shakespeare Quotes

  • ''There's small choice in rotten apples.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Hortensio, in The Taming of the Shrew, act 1, sc. 1. Responding to Gremio's likening of marriage to Katherina—the "shrew"Mto being "whipped at the high cross every morning."
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  • ''Doubting things go ill often hurts more
    Than to be sure they do; for certainties
    Either are past remedies, or, timely knowing,
    The remedy then born.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Imogen, in Cymbeline, act 1, sc. 6, l. 95-8. To Jachimo, who has hinted that all is not well with her; "Doubting" means suspecting; "timely knowing" means knowing in time.
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  • ''How many ages hence
    Shall this our lofty scene be acted over
    In states unborn and accents yet unknown!''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British poet. Julius Caesar (III, i). NAWM-1. The Unabridged William Shakespeare, William George Clark and William Aldis Wright, eds. (1989) Running Press.
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  • ''I see you stand like greyhounds in the slips,
    Straining upon the start. The game's afoot!
    Follow your spirit, and upon this charge
    Cry, "God for Harry! England and Saint George!"''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. King Henry, in Henry V, act 3, sc. 1, l. 31-3. seeing his troops as like greyhounds leashed ("in the slips") and waiting to be loosed to hunt game. St. George is the patron saint of England.
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  • ''Fairest Cordelia, that art most rich being poor,
    Most choice forsaken, and most loved despised,
    Thee and thy virtues here I seize upon.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. King of France, in King Lear, act 1, sc. 1, l. 250-1.
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  • ''I have seen a medicine
    That's able to breathe life into a stone.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Lafew, in All's Well That Ends Well, act 2, sc. 1, l. 72-3. Referring to the beauty of Helena, as able to cure the sick King.
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  • ''Lepidus. What manner o' thing is your crocodile?
    Antony. It is shaped, sir, like itself, and it is as broad as it hath breadth.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Lepidus and Antony, in Antony and Cleopatra, act 2, sc. 7, l. 41-3. Antony mocks the drunken Lepidus, with whom he and Octavius share power.
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  • ''Why do I yield to that suggestion
    Whose horrid image doth unfix my hair
    And make my seated heart knock at my ribs
    Against the use of nature?''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Macbeth, in Macbeth, act 1, sc. 3, l. 134-7. The "horrid image" is the idea of murdering King Duncan.
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  • ''O hateful Error, Melancholy's child,
    Why dost thou show to the apt thoughts of men
    The things that are not?''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Messala, in Julius Caesar, act 5, sc. 3, l. 67-9. On the death of Cassius, who mistakenly thought the battle lost, and took his own life.
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  • ''Thou met'st with things dying, I with things new-born.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Old Shepherd, in The Winter's Tale, act 3, sc. 3, l. 113-4. His son has seen Antigonus die, while the shepherd has found the baby, Perdita, left on the shore.
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Best Poem of William Shakespeare

Shall I Compare Thee To A Summer's Day? (Sonnet 18)

Shall I compare thee to a summer's day?
Thou art more lovely and more temperate.
Rough winds do shake the darling buds of May,
And summer's lease hath all too short a date.
Sometime too hot the eye of heaven shines,
And often is his gold complexion dimmed;
And every fair from fair sometime declines,
By chance, or nature's changing course, untrimmed;
But thy eternal summer shall not fade,
Nor lose possession of that fair thou ow'st,
Nor shall death brag thou wand'rest in his shade,
When in eternal lines to Time thou grow'st.
So long as men can breathe, or ...

Read the full of Shall I Compare Thee To A Summer's Day? (Sonnet 18)

Sonnet Lxvi

Tired with all these, for restful death I cry,
As, to behold desert a beggar born,
And needy nothing trimm'd in jollity,
And purest faith unhappily forsworn,
And guilded honour shamefully misplaced,
And maiden virtue rudely strumpeted,
And right perfection wrongfully disgraced,
And strength by limping sway disabled,
And art made tongue-tied by authority,

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