William Shakespeare

(26 April 1564 - 23 April 1616 / Warwickshire)

William Shakespeare Quotes

  • ''Rosalind. I pray you, what is't a' clock?
    Orlando. You should ask me what time o' day; there's no
    clock in the forest.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Rosalind and Orlando, in As You Like It, act 3, sc. 2, l. 299-305. Time is measured by clocks in the world of business and the court, not in the forest of Arden.
    2 person liked.
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  • ''You call me misbeliever, cut-throat dog,
    And spit upon my Jewish gaberdine,
    And all for use of that which is mine own.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Shylock, in The Merchant of Venice, act 1, sc. 3, l. 111-3. "Gaberdine" means loose cape or cloak.
    1 person liked.
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  • ''Unquiet meals make ill digestions.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. The Abbess, in The Comedy of Errors, act 5, sc. 1, l. 74. To Adriana, who has been criticizing her husband.
    11 person liked.
    6 person did not like.
  • ''The sun of Rome is set. Our day is gone;
    Clouds, dews, and dangers come; our deeds are done.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Titinius, in Julius Caesar, act 5, sc. 3, l. 63-4. On finding Cassius dead at the battle of Philippi.
    3 person liked.
    0 person did not like.
  • ''O time, thou must untangle this, not I.
    It is too hard a knot for me t'untie.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Viola, in Twelfth Night, act 2, sc. 2, l. 40-1. On realizing that Olivia has fallen in love with her, supposing her to be a man (Cesario).
    1 person liked.
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  • ''I think this be the most villainous house in all London road for fleas.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. 2nd Carrier, in Henry IV, Part 1, act 2, sc. 1, l. 14-5. "House" means inn.
    1 person liked.
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  • ''The day frowns more and more.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Antigonus, in The Winter's Tale, act 3, sc. 3, l. 54.
    1 person liked.
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  • ''This was the noblest Roman of them all.
    All the conspirators save only he
    Did that they did in envy of great Caesar.
    He only, in a general honest thought
    And common good to all, made one of them.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Antony, in Julius Caesar, act 5, sc. 5, l. 68-72. His eulogy of Brutus.
    1 person liked.
    0 person did not like.
  • ''You dare easier be friends with me than fight with mine enemy.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Beatrice, in Much Ado About Nothing, act 4, sc. 1, l. 298-9. To Benedick, who hesitates at the idea of killing his friend Claudio.
    11 person liked.
    5 person did not like.
  • ''I have had a most rare vision. I have had a dream, past the wit of man to say what dream it was. Man is but an ass if he go about to expound this dream.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Bottom, in A Midsummer Night's Dream, act 4, sc. 1, l. 204-7.
    8 person liked.
    6 person did not like.

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Best Poem of William Shakespeare

O Mistress Mine, Where Are You Roaming? (Twelfth Night, Act Ii, Scene Iii)

O mistress mine, where are you roaming?
O stay and hear! your true-love's coming
That can sing both high and low;
Trip no further, pretty sweeting,
Journey's end in lovers' meeting-
Every wise man's son doth know.

What is love? 'tis not hereafter;
Present mirth hath present laughter;
What's to come is still unsure:
In delay there lies no plenty,-
Then come kiss me, Sweet and twenty,
Youth's a stuff will not endure.

Read the full of O Mistress Mine, Where Are You Roaming? (Twelfth Night, Act Ii, Scene Iii)

Sonnet Cviii

What's in the brain that ink may character
Which hath not figured to thee my true spirit?
What's new to speak, what new to register,
That may express my love or thy dear merit?
Nothing, sweet boy; but yet, like prayers divine,
I must, each day say o'er the very same,
Counting no old thing old, thou mine, I thine,
Even as when first I hallow'd thy fair name.
So that eternal love in love's fresh case

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