William Shakespeare

(26 April 1564 - 23 April 1616 / Warwickshire)

William Shakespeare Quotes

  • ''Be not afeard; the isle is full of noises,
    Sounds and sweet airs, that give delight, and hurt not.
    Sometimes a thousand twangling instruments
    Will hum about mine ears; and sometime voices,
    That, if I then had waked after long sleep,
    Will make me sleep again.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Caliban, in The Tempest, act 3, sc. 2, l. 135-40. To Stephano and Trinculo, who are scared by Ariel's music.
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  • ''Love no man in good earnest, nor no further in sport
    neither, than with safety of a pure blush thou mayst in
    honor come off again.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Celia, in As You Like It, act 1, sc. 2, l. 27-9. Advice to Rosalind on avoiding commitment in love.
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  • ''Cleopatra. Think you there was or might be such a man
    As this I dreamt of?
    Dolabella. Gentle madam, no.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Cleopatra and Dolabella, in Antony and Cleopatra, act 5, sc. 2, l. 93-4. Dolabella punctures Cleopatra's fantasy of Antony as superman.
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  • ''Be checked for silence,
    But never taxed for speech.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Countess of Rossillion, in All's Well That Ends Well, act 1, sc. 1, l. 67-8. A mother's advice to her son on how to behave at court. Do not mind being rebuked for saying nothing, but never be charged with saying too much.
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  • ''Douglas. Now remains a sweet reversion—
    We may boldly spend, upon the hope
    Of what is to come in.
    A comfort of retirement lives in this.
    Hotspur. A rendezvous, a home to fly unto.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Douglas and Hotspur, in Henry IV, Part 1, act 4, sc. 1, l. 53-7. Thinking of Northumberland and his army, not with them now, as a reserve for the future; taken in their modern sense, the lines suggest an investment plan; "reversion" means inheritance.
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  • ''I will praise any man that will praise me.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Enobarbus, in Antony and Cleopatra, act 2, sc. 6.
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  • ''Farewell! thou art too dear for my possessing,
    And like enough thou know'st thy estimate:
    The charter of thy worth gives thee releasing;
    My bonds in thee are all determinate.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British poet. Farewell! Thou art too dear for my possessing (l. 1-4). . . The Unabridged William Shakespeare, William George Clark and William Aldis Wright, eds. (1989) Running Press.
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  • ''Good Hamlet, cast thy nighted color off.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Gertrude, in Hamlet, act 1, sc. 2, l. 68. Referring to Hamlet's black mourning dress for his father's death.
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  • ''No place, indeed, should murder sanctuarize;
    Revenge should have no bounds.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British poet. Hamlet (IV, vii). NAWM-1. The Unabridged William Shakespeare, William George Clark and William Aldis Wright, eds. (1989) Running Press.
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  • ''How strange or odd some'er I bear myself,
    As I perchance hereafter shall think meet
    To put an antic disposition on.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Hamlet, in Hamlet, act 1, sc. 5, l. 171-2. Announcing to Horatio and Marcellus his idea of pretending to be mad whenever it suits him ("shall think meet).
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Best Poem of William Shakespeare

A Fairy Song

Over hill, over dale,
Thorough bush, thorough brier,
Over park, over pale,
Thorough flood, thorough fire!
I do wander everywhere,
Swifter than the moon's sphere;
And I serve the Fairy Queen,
To dew her orbs upon the green;
The cowslips tall her pensioners be;
In their gold coats spots you see;
Those be rubies, fairy favours;
In those freckles live their savours;
I must go seek some dewdrops here,
And hang a pearl in every cowslip's ear.

Read the full of A Fairy Song

Sonnet Li

Thus can my love excuse the slow offence
Of my dull bearer when from thee I speed:
From where thou art why should I haste me thence?
Till I return, of posting is no need.
O, what excuse will my poor beast then find,
When swift extremity can seem but slow?
Then should I spur, though mounted on the wind;
In winged speed no motion shall I know:
Then can no horse with my desire keep pace;

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