William Shakespeare

(26 April 1564 - 23 April 1616 / Warwickshire)

William Shakespeare Quotes

  • ''O Jesu, he doth it as like one of these harlotry players as
    ever I see!''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Hostess, in Henry IV, Part 1, act 2, sc. 4, l. 395-6. On Falstaff's extempore portrayal of King Henry IV; "harlotry" means rascal.
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  • ''Thou wrong'st a gentleman, who is as far
    From thy report as thou from honor, and
    Solicits here a lady that disdains
    Thee and the devil alike.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Imogen, in Cymbeline, act 1, sc. 6, l. 145-8. Rejecting Jachimo's account of Posthumus's unfaithfulness.
  • ''That we shall die, we know; 'tis but the time,
    And drawing days out, that men stand upon.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British poet. Julius Caesar (III, i). NAWM-1. The Unabridged William Shakespeare, William George Clark and William Aldis Wright, eds. (1989) Running Press.
  • ''O, let us yet be merciful.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. King Henry, in Henry V, act 2, sc. 2, l. 47. On pardoning a prisoner against the advice of others.
  • ''How sour sweet music is,
    When time is broke and no proportion kept!
    So is it in the music of men's lives,
    And here have I the daintiness of ear
    To check time broke in a disordered string;
    But for the concord of my state and time
    Had not an ear to hear my true time broke.
    I wasted time, and now doth time waste me;
    For now hath Time made me his numbering clock.
    My thoughts are minutes, and with sighs they jar
    Their watches on unto mine eyes, the outward watch,
    Whereto my finger, like a dial's point,
    Is pointing still, in cleansing them from tears.
    Now sir, the sound that tells what hour it is
    Are clamorous groans which strike upon my heart,
    Which is the bell.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British poet. King Richard II (V, v). . . The Unabridged William Shakespeare, William George Clark and William Aldis Wright, eds. (1989) Running Press.
  • ''I am famished in his service; you may tell every finger I have with my ribs.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Launcelot Gobbo, in The Merchant of Venice, act 2, sc. 2, l. 106-7. Launcelot is servant to Shylock; "tell" means count.
  • ''It is the star to every wand'ring bark,
    Whose worth's unknown, although his height be taken.
    Love's not Time's fool, though rosy lips and cheeks
    Within his bending sickle's compass come;
    Love alters not with his brief hours and weeks,
    But bears it out even to the edge of doom.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British poet. Let me not to the marriage of true minds (l. 7-12). . . The Unabridged William Shakespeare, William George Clark and William Aldis Wright, eds. (1989) Running Press.
  • ''Let this pernicious hour
    Stand aye accursèd in the calendar!''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Macbeth, in Macbeth, act 4, sc. 1, l. 133-4. "Aye" means for ever.
  • ''The nature of bad news infects the teller.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Messenger, in Antony and Cleopatra, act 1, sc. 2, l. 95.
  • ''You are retired
    As if you were a feasted one and not
    The hostess of the meeting.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Old Shepherd, in The Winter's Tale, act 4, sc. 4, l. 62-4. Perdita is behaving as a guest rather than as the hostess.

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Best Poem of William Shakespeare

All The World's A Stage

All the world's a stage,
And all the men and women merely players;
They have their exits and their entrances,
And one man in his time plays many parts,
His acts being seven ages. At first, the infant,
Mewling and puking in the nurse's arms.
Then the whining schoolboy, with his satchel
And shining morning face, creeping like snail
Unwillingly to school. And then the lover,
Sighing like furnace, with a woeful ballad
Made to his mistress' eyebrow. Then a soldier,
Full of strange oaths and bearded like the pard,
Jealous in honor, sudden and quick in ...

Read the full of All The World's A Stage

Sonnet Lxvi

Tired with all these, for restful death I cry,
As, to behold desert a beggar born,
And needy nothing trimm'd in jollity,
And purest faith unhappily forsworn,
And guilded honour shamefully misplaced,
And maiden virtue rudely strumpeted,
And right perfection wrongfully disgraced,
And strength by limping sway disabled,
And art made tongue-tied by authority,

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