William Shakespeare

(26 April 1564 - 23 April 1616 / Warwickshire)

William Shakespeare Quotes

  • ''She thanked me,
    And bade me, if I had a friend that loved her,
    I should but teach him how to tell my story,
    And that would woo her.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Othello, in Othello, act 1, sc. 3, l. 163-6. Desdemona's indirect way of making known her love for Othello.
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  • ''My falcon now is sharp and passing empty,
    And till she stoop she must not be full-gorged,
    For then she never looks upon her lure.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Petruchio, in The Taming of the Shrew, act 4, sc. 1, l. 190-2. Like a falcon, Katherine has been starved in order to tame her; the "lure," baited with pieces of meat, was used by falconers to recall the bird.
  • ''O, these deliberate fools, when they do choose,
    They have the wisdom by their wit to lose.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Portia, in The Merchant of Venice, act 2, sc. 9, l. 80-1. "Deliberate" means calculating; referring to the Prince of Aragon's mistaken choice of the silver casket.
  • ''My library
    Was dukedom large enough.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Prospero, in The Tempest, act 1, sc. 2, l. 109-10 (1623).
  • ''I'll put a girdle round about the earth
    In forty minutes.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Robin Goodfellow (Puck), in A Midsummer Night's Dream, act 2, sc. 1, l. 175-76 (1600). Boasting of how short a time it will take him to fetch the love charm wanted by Oberon.
  • ''I pray you do not fall in love with me,
    For I am falser than vows made in wine.
    Besides, I like you not.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Rosalind, in As You Like It, act 3, sc. 5, l. 72-4. To Phebe, while Rosalind is in disguise as a man.
  • ''He plays o'the viol-de-gamboys, and speaks three or four languages word for word without book, and hath all the good gifts of nature.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Sir Toby Belch, in Twelfth Night, act 1, sc. 3, l. 25-8. Overpraising Sir Andrew Aguecheek; the viola da gamba, or bass viol, was held between the legs, and the image has sexual overtones; "without book" means by heart.
  • ''The iron tongue of midnight hath told twelve.
    Lovers, to bed; 'tis almost fairy time.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Theseus, in A Midsummer Night's Dream, act 5, sc. 1, l. 363-4. "Iron tongue" means clapper of a bell.
  • ''I have, as when the sun doth light a storm,
    Buried this sigh in wrinkle of a smile;
    But sorrow that is couched in seeming gladness
    Is like that mirth fate turns to sudden sadness.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Troilus, in Troilus and Cressida, act 1, sc. 1, l. 37-40. He has been pretending to be happy in order to conceal his lovesickness from his brother and father.
  • ''Faster than springtime showers comes thought on thought.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. York, in Henry VI, Part 2, act 3, sc. 1, l. 337.

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Best Poem of William Shakespeare

All The World's A Stage

All the world's a stage,
And all the men and women merely players;
They have their exits and their entrances,
And one man in his time plays many parts,
His acts being seven ages. At first, the infant,
Mewling and puking in the nurse's arms.
Then the whining schoolboy, with his satchel
And shining morning face, creeping like snail
Unwillingly to school. And then the lover,
Sighing like furnace, with a woeful ballad
Made to his mistress' eyebrow. Then a soldier,
Full of strange oaths and bearded like the pard,
Jealous in honor, sudden and quick in ...

Read the full of All The World's A Stage

Sonnet Li

Thus can my love excuse the slow offence
Of my dull bearer when from thee I speed:
From where thou art why should I haste me thence?
Till I return, of posting is no need.
O, what excuse will my poor beast then find,
When swift extremity can seem but slow?
Then should I spur, though mounted on the wind;
In winged speed no motion shall I know:
Then can no horse with my desire keep pace;

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